PreviousNext
Undergraduate Programs
Calendar 2004-05


Faculty of Science, including School of Computer Science

1 The Faculty

1.1 Location

Dawson Hall
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-4210
Faculty Website: www.mcgill.ca/science
Student Affairs Office Website: www.mcgill.ca/artscisao 

The Student Affairs Office and the Office of the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science are located in Dawson Hall, Rooms 110 and 115. The Student Affairs Office serves students in both the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Arts.

1.2 Faculty Administrative Officers

Alan G. Shaver; B.Sc.(Car.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)

Dean

Morton J. Mendelson; B.Sc.(McG.), A.M., Ph.D.(Harv.)

Associate Dean (Academic)

TBA

Associate Dean (Student Affairs)

David H. Burns; B.Sc.(Puget Sound), Ph.D.(Wash.)

Associate Dean (Research)

Josie D'Amico

Assistant to the Dean

Sharon Bezeau; B.A.(Tor.), M.A.(C'dia)

Recorder and Chief Invigilator

Donald Sedgwick; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.)

Senior Adviser

1.3 Programs and Teaching in Science

The Faculty of Science is committed to providing outstanding teaching and research facilities. The Faculty draws on its involvement in cutting-edge research to ensure teaching excellence at the undergraduate level. Professors who are spearheading projects that are changing people's understanding of the world teach regularly at the undergraduate level. Also, research-based independent study courses offer students the opportunity to contribute to their professors' work, rather than just learn about it.

In an effort to supplement classroom learning with real life experience, the Faculty of Science has increased opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in fieldwork. Certain B.Sc. programs can include an internship component. This is on top of the many undergraduate students the Faculty hires for Work-Study projects and other research programs. McGill Science students have an opportunity to get involved in the structuring of their own education. A Science Undergraduate Society initiative launched Operation Open Access, a project that gives Science students universal access to e-mail, the Internet, and the latest in science software through computer `infopoints' located in areas of the campus frequented by Science students.

The Faculty of Science offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.). Admission is selective; fulfilment of the minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Admission criteria are described under Admission Requirements.

There are also two Diploma programs offered in Science. The Diploma in Environment under the McGill School of Environment, is a 30-credit program available to holders of a B.Sc. or B.A. or equivalent. The Diploma in Meteorology, see section 12.2 "Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (ATOC)", is a one-year program available to holders of a degree in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics and other appropriate disciplines who wish to qualify for a professional career in Meteorology. All credits for these diplomas must be completed at McGill.

The concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to obtain both a B.Sc. and a B.Ed. after a minimum of 135 credits of study. For more information see section 12.28 "Science for Teachers" and Concurrent Bachelor of Science (Major or Major Concentration with a Minor for Teachers) and Bachelor of Education Secondary Program, Faculty of Education.

A Bachelor of Software Engineering program is offered jointly with the Faculty of Engineering, refer to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering .

Finally, the Faculties of Arts and Science jointly offer the Bachelor of Arts and Science (B.A.&Sc.), which is described in the Arts and Science section of the Calendar.

1.4 Student Affairs Office

The Student Affairs Office, located in Dawson Hall, provides assistance in interpreting records as well as general academic information and advice on the following: prerequisites and programs, degree requirements, registration, course change, procedures for withdrawal, deferred exams, supplemental exams, rereads, academic standing, inter-faculty transfer, year or term away, transfer credits, second programs, second degrees, and graduation.

Special requests can be made, in writing, to the Associate Dean (Academic and Student Affairs).

The Committee on Student Standing (CSS) will consider appeals of the Associate Dean's decisions. For information about CSS, see the Associate Dean's secretary.

2 Faculty Admission Requirements

For information about admission requirements for the B.Sc., please refer to Admission Requirements.

For information about inter-faculty transfers, please refer to the General University Information and Regulations, Inter-Faculty Transfer, as well as the relevant information posted on the Student Affairs Office Website at www.mcgill.ca/artscisao, and in the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, Room 110.

3 Faculty Degree Requirements

Each student in the Faculty of Science must be aware of the Faculty Regulations as stated in this Calendar.

While departmental and faculty advisers and staff are always available to give advice and guidance, the ultimate responsibility for completeness and correctness of course selection and registration, for compliance with, and completion of, program and degree requirements, and for the observance of regulations and deadlines rests with the student. It is the student's responsibility to seek guidance from the Student Affairs Office if in any doubt; misunderstanding or misapprehension will not be accepted as cause for dispensation from any regulation, deadline, program or degree requirement.

To be eligible for a B.Sc. degree, students must fulfill all Faculty and program requirements as indicated below:
Minimum Credit Requirement
Residency
Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
Time Limit for the Completion of the Degree
Program Requirements
Course Requirements

3.1 Minimum Credit Requirement

Each student's minimum credit requirement for the degree is determined at the time of acceptance and is specified in the letter of admission.

Students are normally admitted to a four-year program requiring the completion of 120 credits, but advanced standing of up to 30 credits may be granted to students who obtain satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, Advanced Placement tests, or the Diploma of Collegial Studies (DCS). Quebec students with a DCS in Science are granted 30 credits advanced standing and will have normally completed the equivalent of, and are therefore exempt from, the basic science courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics and statistics, and physics. Students with satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement tests may be exempt from some or all of the basic science courses.

Students who are readmitted after interrupting their studies for a period of five consecutive years or more may be required to complete a minimum of 60 credits and satisfy the requirements of a program. In this case, a new CGPA will be calculated. The Associate Dean, in consultation with the appropriate department, may approve a lower minimum for students who had completed 60 credits or more before interrupting their studies.

Students who are readmitted after a period of absence are subject to the program and degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission. The Associate Dean, in consultation with the department, may approve exemption from any new requirements.

3.2 Residency

To obtain a B.Sc. degree, students must satisfy the following residency requirements: a minimum of 60 credits of courses used to satisfy the B.Sc. degree requirements must be taken and passed at McGill, exclusive of any courses completed as part of the basic science requirements defined below. At least two-thirds of all departmental program requirements (Honours, Major, Faculty Program, or Minor) must normally be completed at McGill. However, students in Honours, Major, and Faculty Programs who pursue an approved Study Away or Exchange Program may, with departmental approval, be exempted from the two-thirds rule. In addition, some departments may require that their students complete specific components of their program at McGill.

The residency requirement for diplomas is 30 credits completed at McGill.

3.3 Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

Each candidate for the degree must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.00.

3.4 Time Limit for the Completion of the Degree

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their degree requirements are expected to complete their program in no more than eight terms after their initial registration for the degree. Students who exceed these limits must receive permission from the Faculty to continue their studies. Permission for exceeding the time limits will normally be granted only for valid academic reasons, such as a change of program (approval of the department is required) and part-time status.

Students in the Freshman Program become subject to these regulations one year after their initial registration.

3.5 Program Requirements

3.5.1 Freshman Program and Basic Science Requirements

Students who need 97-120 credits (four years) to complete their degree requirements must register in the Science Freshman Program, which is designed to provide the basic science foundation for a student's subsequent three-year Faculty, Major, or Honours program. The basic science requirements are as follows: two terms each of calculus, general chemistry, and general physics, and one term of biology.

Students who have completed the Diploma of Collegial Studies, Advanced Placement exams, Advanced Levels, the International Baccalaureate, the French Baccalaureate, or McGill placement examinations may receive exemption and/or credit for all or part of the basic science courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics and statistics, and physics. Similarly, students who have completed courses at other universities or colleges may receive exemptions and/or credits.

For a more detailed description of the Science Freshman Program, students should consult the Arts and Science Freshman Student information available on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

3.5.2 Faculty, Major, and Honours Programs

Science students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their degree requirements are required to have an approved degree program and to select their courses in each term with a view to timely completion of their degree and program requirements. Students must register in one of the following types of departmental programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science:

A Faculty program

is an approved coherent selection of courses giving students a useful concentration in a recognized area. Students in a Faculty program may choose a pattern of study that can range from one yielding a broad education to one specializing in particular areas.

Major programs

are more specialized than Faculty programs and are usually centred on a specific discipline or department. For prospective teachers, the Faculty also offers Major programs that can constitute the Science component of the Concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. Program. For more information about this joint degree, refer to section 3.5.5 "Concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. Program".

Honours programs

typically involve an even higher degree of specialization, often include supervised research, and require students to maintain a high academic standard. Although Honours programs are specially designed to prepare students for graduate studies, graduates of the other degree programs are also normally admissible to most graduate schools. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies in their discipline should consult a departmental adviser regarding the appropriate selection of courses in their field.

3.5.3 Minor and Minor Concentration Programs

In addition to the above degree programs, students in the Faculty of Science may select a Minor program. These are coherent sequences of courses in a given discipline or interdisciplinary area that may be taken in addition to the courses required for the degree program.

Science Minors consist of up to 24 credits.

Arts Minor Concentrations consist of 18 credits.

A minimum of 18 new credits must be completed in the Minor or Minor Concentration.

For a list of Minor Programs; for Minor Concentrations that are approved for Science students, see section 11.10 "Faculty of Arts Major and Minor Concentration Programs Available to Science Students".

3.5.4 Other Second Programs

In addition to a Faculty, Major, or Honours program, students may pursue a second Faculty, Major, or Honours program, or an Arts Major Concentration program. A minimum of 36 new credits must be completed in the second program.

3.5.5 Concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. Program

The Concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. Program described in section 12.28 "Science for Teachers", applies only to students who were already registered in it as of September 2002.

Admission into the program is open for September 2004.

Science students who might want to enter the program should visit the B.Sc./B.Ed. Web site at www.physics.mcgill.ca/~bscbed or contact Prof. Dik Harris, e-mail: dik.harris@ mcgill.ca.

3.5.6 Internship Program for Engineering and Science (IYES)

Certain B.Sc. programs offered by the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Physics, and the School of Computer Science can include an internship component, see section 11.9 "Internship Programs - Internship Year for Engineering and Science (IYES)". Students from other departments are also eligible to apply for an internship year, but this will not be part of their degree designation. For more details, students should refer to the Faculty of Engineering, IYES: Internship Year for Engineering and Science.

3.5.7 McGill School of Environment

The Faculty of Science is one of the three faculties in partnership with the McGill School of Environment, see page 435.

3.5.8 Bachelor of Software Engineering and
B.Sc. in Software Engineering

The School of Computer Science, jointly with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, offers a Bachelor of Software Engineering program. Graduates of the B.S.E. program should be eligible for accreditation (once accreditation standards for Software Engineers have been adopted). For program details, students should refer to the Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering .

The School of Computer Science also offers a B.Sc. Major program in Software Engineering. For details of the B.Sc. Major, students should refer to section 12.8 "Computer Science (COMP)". The B.Sc. program does not lead to accreditation.

3.6 Course Requirements

All required and complementary courses used to fulfill program requirements, including the basic science requirements, must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students who fail to obtain a satisfactory grade in a required course must either pass the supplemental examination in the course or do additional work for a supplemental grade, if these options are available, or repeat the course. Course substitution will be allowed only in special cases; students should consult their academic adviser.

Normally, students are permitted to repeat a failed course only once. (Failure is considered to be a grade of less than C or the administrative failures of J and KF.) If a required course is failed a second time, a student may appeal to the Associate Dean for permission to take the course a third time. If permission is denied by the Associate Dean and/or by the Committee on Student Standing, on appeal, the student must withdraw from the program. If the failed course is a complementary course required by the program, a student may choose to replace it with another appropriate complementary course. If a student chooses to substitute another complementary course for a complementary course in which a D was received, credit for the first course will still be given, but as an elective. If a student repeats a required course in which a D was received, credit will be given only once.

Full details of the course requirements for all programs offered are given in each unit's section together with the locations of departmental advisory offices, program directors, and telephone numbers should further information be required.

3.6.1 Course Overlap

Students will not receive credit towards their degree for any course that overlaps in content with a course passed at McGill, at another university, at CEGEP, or advanced placement exams, Advanced Level results, International Baccalaureate Diploma, or French Baccalaureate. It is the student's responsibility to consult the Student Affairs Office or the department offering the course as to whether or not credit can be obtained and to be aware of exclusion clauses specified in the course description in the Calendar.

Sometimes the same course is offered by two different departments. Such courses are called "double-prefix" courses. When such courses are offered simultaneously, students should take the course offered by the department in which they are obtaining their degree. For example, in the case of double-prefix courses CHEM XYZ and PHYS XYZ, Chemistry students would take CHEM XYZ and the Physics students would take PHYS XYZ. If a double-prefix course were offered by different departments in alternate years, students could take whatever course best fits their schedule.

Credit for computer and statistics courses

offered by faculties other than Science requires the permission of the Associate Dean of Science (Academic and Student Affairs) and will be granted only under exceptional circumstances.

Credit for statistics courses

will be given with the following stipulations:

3.6.2 Project Courses

Students may normally receive no more than 12 credits for individual project or independent study courses toward a B.Sc. degree.

3.6.3 Courses outside the Faculties of Arts and Science

Students in the Faculty of Science should consult the statement of regulations for taking courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science. The regulations are posted in the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, and on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/ artscisao. A list of approved/not approved courses in other faculties is posted with the regulations; students may take courses on the approved list and may not, under any circumstances, take courses on the not-approved list. Requests for permission to take courses that are not on either list should be addressed to the Associate Dean.

The regulations are as follows:

3.6.4 Courses taken under the Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory Option

Students may take one elective course per term that is to be graded under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option, to a maximum of 10% of credits taken at McGill to fulfill their degree requirements. The decision to have an elective course graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory must be made by students before the end of the Drop/Add period. For more information, students should consult Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option.

3.6.5 Courses in English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL courses are open to Science students under the regulations specified by the English and French Language Centre.

3.6.6 Auditing of Courses

No auditing of courses is permitted at McGill.

3.6.7 Course Credit Weight

The credit assigned to a particular course should reflect the amount of effort it demands of the student. Normally, one credit will represent three hours total work per week for one term - including a combination of lecture hours, other contact hours, such as laboratory periods, tutorials, and problem periods, as well as personal study time.

4 Advising

Fall-term academic advising for newly admitted students takes place during the week prior to the beginning of classes. Students who are newly admitted to the winter term should consult the Calendar of Dates for exact advising dates.

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their degree requirements must consult an academic adviser in their proposed department of study to obtain advice and approval of their course selection. Quebec students with a Diploma of Collegial Studies in Science have normally taken the equivalent of, and are therefore exempt from, the 100-level basic science courses in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics. Such students may also be exempt from some 200-level courses. Students with satisfactory results in International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement tests may also be exempt from some or all of the basic sciences courses. To facilitate program planning, they must present their transcripts and letters of admission. For a detailed description of advising and registration procedures, students should refer to Welcome to McGill, which they receive upon acceptance from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, as well as to the information posted on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/ artscisao.

Students who need 97-120 credits to complete their degree requirements will normally be registered in a Freshman Program until they complete their first year. They must consult an adviser in the Student Affairs Office to obtain advice and approval of their course selection. For a detailed description of advising and registration procedures, Freshman students should refer to Welcome to McGill, which they receive upon acceptance from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, as well as the information on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Advising for all returning students takes place in March for the coming academic year. For more information, students should refer to the information on the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Academic advising is also available by e-mail. The address is adviser.artsci@mcgill.ca.

5 Registration

All students register by Minerva, McGill's Web-based registration system.

New students register in August prior to the first day of classes. For detailed information about registration, students should refer to Registration, Welcome to McGill, to the information on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao, and to the Minerva Website, www.mcgill.ca/minerva.

Returning students register at the end of March, April and May for the coming academic year. For detailed information about registration, students should refer to Registration, and to the information on the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao, and to the Minerva Website, www.mcgill.ca/minerva.

Students who fall into unsatisfactory standing at the end of the academic year will have their registration cancelled. They may not reregister in the Faculty. However, students who can provide proof of exceptional extenuating circumstances that affected their academic performance may appeal to the Associate Dean of Science for readmission. For more information, students should consult the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, or read the information on the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Students who have an outstanding fee balance from a previous term or outstanding fines will not be permitted to register. In addition, students who have registered for the upcoming academic year, but subsequently take summer courses without paying the fees, will have their registration cancelled. Registration on Minerva will be denied until these debts are paid in full. Students must pay all debts before the end of the registration period to be permitted to reregister. Students with financial problems should consult the Student Aid Office, Brown Student Services Building.

Students who decide not to return to McGill after initiating registration must withdraw from all of their courses on Minerva or inform the Student Affairs Office in writing. The deadline for withdrawal from the University is the same deadline as for a course withdrawal; see the Calendar of Dates. After the deadline, students may, under exceptional circumstances, be granted permission to withdraw from the University. Such students should contact the Student Affairs Office in Dawson Hall for further information.

5.1 Program Registration

Students should refer to Welcome to McGill, the Arts and Science Registration information on the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao, or the Minerva Website, www.mcgill.ca/ minerva.

See section 11 "Lists of Programs Offered" for a list of programs that can be taken by Science students.

5.2 Course Registration

All courses have limited enrolment.

Subject to the course restrictions listed in this section and unless otherwise indicated, students in the Faculty of Science may register for and take for credit any course in the sections of the Calendar applicable to the Faculties of Arts and of Science.

Since the registration system is unable to verify whether or not Faculty regulations are respected, it is technically possible to register for courses that are closed to Science students. When students' records are manually verified, however, any "closed" courses will be flagged after the end of course change period as "not for credit towards the B.Sc.". As a result, the students' expected date of graduation may be delayed.

Some courses may require special permission. Students should consult this Calendar and/or the Class Schedule to determine if permission is required of the instructor, the department, or the Faculty for any course they wish to take.

Students who believe they have valid reasons to take a course that is normally closed to Science students must obtain permission from the Associate Dean of Science (Academic and Student Affairs) before registering for the course. Only the Associate Dean or, on appeal, the Committee on Student Standing, can make exceptions to the Faculty rules.

5.2.1 Registration for First-Year Seminars

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide a closer interaction with professors and better working relations with peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars endeavour to teach the latest scholarly developments and expose participants to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some are limited to even fewer than that.

Students may take only one First-Year Seminar. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one of them. Please consult the departmental listings for course descriptions and availability.

CHEM 199
FYS: Why Chemistry?
COMP 199
FYS: Excursions in Computer Science
GEOG 199
FYS: Geo-Environments
PHGY 199
FYS: History of Genetic Engineering
PSYT 199
FYS: Mental Illness and the Brain

The First-Year Seminars offered by the Faculty of Arts are also open to Science students. For a complete listing, please consult Arts First Year Seminars.

5.3 Registration for Graduation

Students in their final year must indicate their expected date of graduation on Minerva and must verify this date on verification forms. When final-year students change their expected date of graduation, they must notify the Student Affairs Office immediately. Failure to do so may postpone graduation.

Students who complete their degree requirements at any time after their last registered term at McGill must apply to the Associate Dean (Academic and Student Affairs) to graduate. Application to graduate must be made sufficiently in advance of the expected graduation date to allow the Faculty to verify the student's record. For further information, students should contact the Student Affairs Office.

6 Grading and Credit

Before the end of the course change (drop/add) period, each instructor will inform students of the following:

6.1 Incomplete Grades

An instructor who believes that there is justification for a student to delay submitting term work may extend the deadline until after the end of the course. In this case, the instructor will submit a grade of K (incomplete), indicating the date by which the work is to be completed. The maximum extensions for the submission of grades to the Student Affairs Office are as follows:

Students' deadlines for submitting their work must be sufficiently in advance of these dates to ensure that the work can be graded and the mark submitted on time. It is important to note that instructors may impose earlier deadlines than those listed above.

If marks to clear Ks have not been submitted to the Student Affairs Office by April 30 for fall courses, or July 30 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter, the K is automatically changed to a KF and counts as an F in the GPA.

Students with a grade of K who have serious extenuating circumstances may request an extension of the K deadline (KE) from the Associate Dean (Student Affairs). Please refer to Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA) for more information about grading and credit.

7 Examinations

Students should refer to Examinations for information about final examinations and deferred examinations. Note that for the Faculty of Science, University Regulations Concerning Final Examinations applies to courses up to and including the 500 level.

The exam schedules are posted on the McGill Website, www.mcgill.ca and in the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, Room 110, normally one month after the start of classes for Tentative Exam Schedules, and two months after the start of classes for Final Examination Schedules. Students should also refer to the Student Affairs Website for more information, www.mcgill.ca/ artscisao.

8 Supplemental Assessments

8.1 Supplemental Examinations

Students who wish to write supplemental examinations for certain courses must apply to the Student Affairs Office for permission. The following conditions apply:

For courses in the Faculties of Arts and of Science, the supplemental examination period for fall courses is during the months of April and May; for winter courses, and courses spanning fall/ winter, the supplemental examination period is during the last week of August.

Supplemental applications are available at the Student Affairs Office. The deadline for submission of applications is March 1 for fall courses and July 15 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter. A non-refundable fee for each supplemental paper is payable at the time of application. Students who register for a supplemental examination and subsequently find themselves unprepared for it should not write it; except for the loss of the registration fee, there is no penalty for not writing a supplemental examination. Students should consult the Student Affairs Office for further information.

8.2 Additional Work

Instructors of courses that include graded written term work may choose to provide the option of additional work to eligible students. The following conditions apply:

Additional work applications are available in the Student Affairs Office. The deadline for submission of applications is March 1 for fall courses and July 15 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter. A non-refundable fee is payable for each course at the time of application. Students should consult the Student Affairs Office for further information.

8.3 Reassessments and Rereads

In accordance with the Charter of Student Rights, and subject to the conditions stated therein, students have the right to consult any written submission for which they have received a mark, to discuss this submission with the examiner, and to obtain an impartial and competent review of any mark.

The Faculty of Science recognizes two types of impartial reviews: reassessments of course work (i.e., of term papers, mid-terms, assignments, quizzes, etc.) and rereads of final examinations. In both cases, rather than recorrect the work and grade it as they would have done themselves, reviewers assess the appropriateness of the original grade based, for example, on the application of the grading key to the student's work. If a grade is deemed unfair, it is changed, whether the new grade is higher or lower than the original - i.e., the reviewer's grade takes precedence over the original grade.

A. Reassessment of Course Work

Reassessments of course work are administered and conducted solely by the units involved according to procedures specified by the units and made available to staff and students. Requests for such reassessments must be made within 10 working days after the graded material has been made available for students to view it. Reassessments should normally be completed within 20 working days of the request.

B. Rereads of Final Examinations

Rereads of final examinations are administered by the Student Affairs Office, but conducted by the units involved. Students must apply in writing to the Student Affairs Office by March 31 for courses in the Fall term and by September 30 for courses in the Winter or Summer terms (these deadlines are strictly enforced and no requests for rereads will be accepted past them). Students are assessed a fee of $35 for such rereads. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students consult the instructor of the course before requesting a reread of a final examination.

Reassessments and rereads in courses not in the Faculty of Science are subject to the deadlines, rules, and regulations of the relevant faculty.

9 Academic Standing

Academic standing is based primarily on students' cumulative grade point average (CGPA), but may also be affected by their term grade point average (TGPA). Academic standing is assessed in January for the fall term, in May for the winter term, and in September for the summer term. Academic standing in each term determines if students will be allowed to continue their studies in the next term and if any conditions will be attached to their registration.

Decisions about academic standing in the fall term are based only on grades that are available in January. Grades for courses in which students have deferred examinations and fall-term grades for courses that span the fall and winter terms do not affect academic standing for the fall term, even though they will ultimately affect students' fall TGPA. Therefore, academic standings for the fall term that are designated as "interim" should be interpreted as advisory. Note that interim standing will not appear on external transcripts. Interim standing decisions are mentioned below only if the rules for them differ from those for regular standing decisions.

Satisfactory/Interim Satisfactory Standing

Students in satisfactory standing may continue in their program.

Probationary/Interim Probationary Standing

Students in probationary standing may continue in their program, but must carry a reduced load (maximum 14 credits per term) and raise their TGPA and CGPA to return to satisfactory standing (see above). They should see their departmental adviser to discuss their course selection.

Students in interim probationary standing may continue in their program, but should evaluate their course load and reduce it as appropriate. They are strongly advised to consult a departmental adviser, before the withdrawal deadlines, about their course selection for the winter term.

Unsatisfactory Readmitted Standing

Students who were previously in unsatisfactory standing and who were readmitted to the Faculty by the Associate Dean (Academic and Student Affairs) or the Committee on Student Standing will have their standing changed to unsatisfactory readmitted standing. Their course load is specified in their letter of readmission as are the conditions they must meet to be allowed to continue in their program. They should see their departmental adviser to discuss their course selection.

Unsatisfactory/Interim Unsatisfactory Standing

Students in interim unsatisfactory standing may continue in their program, but should evaluate their course load and reduce it as appropriate. They are strongly advised to consult a departmental adviser, before the withdrawal deadlines, about their course selection for the winter term.

Students in unsatisfactory standing have failed to meet the minimum standards set by the Faculty. They may not continue in their program, and their registration will be cancelled.

Appeals for readmission by students in unsatisfactory standing should be addressed to the Associate Dean (Academic and Student Affairs) no later than July 15 for readmission to the fall term and November 15 for the winter term. Readmission will be considered only when proof of extenuating circumstances that affected academic performance can be provided (e.g., medical or other documentation). Students in unsatisfactory standing for the second time must withdraw permanently.

Normally supplemental examinations are not permitted; however, students in unsatisfactory standing may appeal to the Associate Dean for permission to write a supplemental examination, clearly stating the reasons for special consideration and providing proof as appropriate.

Students in the Concurrent B.Sc./B.Ed. Program who receive an F or J in any Education Field Experience course are placed in unsatisfactory standing. Although they may complete their term, they are required to withdraw from the Concurrent Program. However, they may apply to transfer to a conventional B.Sc. program as outlined in section 12.28 "Science for Teachers".

Incomplete Standings

Standing awaits deferred examination.
Must clear Ks, Ls or Supplemental.
Standing Incomplete.

Students with incomplete standings in the winter or summer term may register for the fall term, but their standing must be resolved by the end of the course-change period for that term. Students whose incomplete standing changes to satisfactory, probationary, or interim unsatisfactory standing may continue in the program. Students whose standing changes to unsatisfactory standing may not continue in their program, and their registration will be cancelled.

Students whose standing changes to unsatisfactory and who wish to ask for permission to continue in their program must make a request to the Associate Dean as soon as they are placed in unsatisfactory standing. Readmission will be considered only when proof of extenuating circumstances that affected academic performance can be provided (e.g., medical or other documentation).

Students whose standing is still incomplete by the end of course change period should immediately consult with the Student Affairs Office.

At the end of the winter term, students with a mark of K or L will be placed in the appropriate standing in June, if the outstanding mark in the course will not affect their result. Otherwise the standing decision will only be made once their incomplete marks have been cleared. For more information about incomplete grades please refer to section 6.1 "Incomplete Grades".

10 Awards and Honourary Designations

10.1 Honours and First-Class Honours

Departments may recommend to the Faculty that graduating students registered in an Honours program be awarded Honours or First-Class Honours under the following conditions:

Students in an Honours program whose CGPA is below 3.00 or who did not satisfy certain program requirements must consult their adviser to determine if they are eligible to graduate in a program other than Honours.

10.2 Distinction or Great Distinction

Students in Faculty or Major programs whose academic performance is appropriate may be awarded their degrees with Distinction or Great Distinction under the following conditions:

10.3 Dean's Honour List

The designation Dean's Honour List may be awarded to graduating students under the following conditions:

The designation Dean's Honour List may be awarded at the end of each academic year to continuing students under the following conditions:

10.4 Medals and Prizes

Various medals, scholarships and prizes are open to continuing and graduating students. Full details of these are set out in the Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Calendar, available in the Admissions, Recuitment and Registrar's Office or on the Web www.mcgill.ca. No application is required except in the case of the Moyse Travelling Scholarships.

11 Lists of Programs Offered

11.1 Faculty Programs

Anatomy and Cell Biology
Biochemistry
Biology
Biology and Mathematics - see Biology
Chemistry
Chemistry and Biological Sciences - see Chemistry
Chemistry and Mathematics - see Chemistry
Mathematics and Computer Science - see Mathematics and Statistics. Also check with the School of Computer Science, since that unit limits enrolment.
Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science - see Mathematics and Statistics. Also check with the School of Computer Science, since that unit limits enrolment.
Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics - see Mathematics and Statistics
Microbiology and Immunology - application required, see departmental entry for information.
Physics
Physiology
Psychology

11.2 Major Programs

Anatomy and Cell Biology
Atmospheric Science
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Chemistry (Bio-organic option)
Chemistry (Environmental Chemistry option)
Chemistry (Materials)
Computer Science - application required, see unit entry for information.
Earth and Planetary Sciences
Environment (Atmospheric Environment and Air Quality domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Biodiversity and Conservation domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Earth Sciences and Economics domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Ecological Determinants of Health domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Environmetrics domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Food Production and Environment domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Land Surface Processes and Environmental Change) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Renewable Resource Management domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Environment (Water Environments and Ecosystems domain) - see McGill School of Environment.
Geography
Mathematics
Microbiology and Immunology - application required, see departmental entry for information.
Physics
Physiology
Psychology
Software Engineering - application required, see unit entry for information

11.3 Joint Major Programs

Atmospheric Science and Physics
Mathematics and Computer Science - see Mathematics and Statistics. Also check with the School of Computer Science, since that unit limits enrolment.
Physics and Computer Science - see Physics. Also check with the School of Computer Science, since that unit limits enrolment.
Physics and Geophysics
Physiology and Mathematics
Physiology and Physics

11.4 Honours Programs

Anatomy and Cell Biology
Applied Mathematics
Atmospheric Science
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Chemistry (Bio-organic option)
Chemistry (Environmental Chemistry option)
Chemistry (Materials)
Computer Science - application required, see unit entry for information.
Earth Sciences
Planetary Sciences
Geography
Immunology (Interdepartmental) - application required, see Faculty of Science entry for Immunology.
Mathematics
Microbiology and Immunology
Physics
Physiology
Probability and Statistics
Psychology

11.5 Joint Honours Programs

Mathematics and Computer Science - see Mathematics and Statistics. Also check with the School of Computer Science, since that unit limits enrolment.
Mathematics and Physics - see Physics
Physics and Chemistry - see Physics

11.6 Minor Programs

Atmospheric Science
Biology
Biotechnology
Chemical Engineering - see Chemistry
Chemistry
Cognitive Science
Computational Molecular Biology - see Computer Science.
Computer Science
Earth and Planetary Sciences
Education for Science Students - see Science for Teachers.
Electrical Engineering - see Physics.
Environment
Geochemistry - see Earth and Planetary Sciences.
Geography
Geographical Information Systems - see Geography.
Human Nutrition - see Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entry for School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.
Kinesiology - see Faculty of Science entry.
Management* - see Faculty of Science entry for Management.
Mathematics
Music Technology - application required, see Faculty of Science entry for Music.
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Physics
Psychology
Statistics - see Mathematics and Statistics.
Technological Entrepreneurship for Science Students - application required, see Faculty of Science entry.

Notes:

11.7 Concurrent B.Sc/B.Ed. Program (Science for Teachers)

Programs Accepting Students as of September 2004:
Major in Mathematics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Biology with a Minor in Chemistry for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Biology with a Minor in Physics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Chemistry with a Minor in Biology for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Chemistry with a Minor in Physics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Physics with a Minor in Biology for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Major Concentration in Physics with a Minor in Chemistry for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Programs No Longer Accepting New Students:
Biology and Chemistry for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Biology and Geography for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Biology and Mathematics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Chemistry and Physics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Mathematics and Chemistry for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.
Mathematics and Physics for Teachers - see Science for Teachers.

11.8 Bachelor of Arts and Science

Please see the Arts and Science section of the Calendar for details.

11.9 Internship Programs - Internship Year for Engineering and Science (IYES)

The following programs are also available with an Internship component. For more information, please see IYES: Internship Year for Engineering and Science.

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Major in Atmospheric Science
Honours in Atmospheric Science
Computer Science
Major in Computer Science
Honours in Computer Science
Mathematics and Statistics
Major in Mathematics
Honours in Mathematics
Honours in Applied Mathematics
Honours in Probability & Statistics
Joint Majors in Mathematics & Computer Science
Joint Honours in Mathematics & Computer Science
Physics
Faculty Program in Physics
Major in Physics
Honours in Physics
Joint Faculty Program in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics
Joint Major Program in Atmospheric Science and Physics
Joint Major Program in Physics & Geophysics
Joint Honours Program in Physics and Chemistry
Joint Honours Program in Physics and Mathematics

11.10 Faculty of Arts Major and Minor Concentration Programs Available to Science Students

For more information, please see the relevant departmental entries in the Faculty of Arts section.

Major Concentrations
African Studies
Anthropology
Art History
Canadian Studies
Classics
East Asian Studies
Economics
English - Literature
English - Drama and Theatre
English - Cultural Studies
Langue et littérature françaises - Léttres
Langue et littérature françaises - Léttres et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Linguistique du français
Geography (Urban Systems)
German Language and Literature - see German Studies.
German Literature and Culture - see German Studies.
Contemporary German Studies - see German Studies.
Hispanic Literature and Culture - see Hispanic Studies.
Hispanic Languages - see Hispanic Studies.
History
Humanistic Studies
International Development Studies
Italian Studies
Italian Studies (Medieval and Renaissance)
Jewish Studies
Latin-American Studies
Linguistics
Middle East Studies
Music
North American Studies
Philosophy
Philosophy and Western Religions
Political Science
Québec Studies
Russian
Scriptures and Interpretation (see Religious Studies)
Sociology
World Religions (see Religious Studies)
Women's Studies
Minor Concentrations
African Studies
Anthropological Archaeology - see Anthropology
Anthropology, Socio-Cultural
Art History
Canadian Ethnic Studies
Canadian Studies
Catholic Studies
Classics
East Asian Language and Literature
East Asian Cultural Studies
East Asian Studies, Advanced
Economics
English - Literature
English - Drama and Theatre
English - Cultural Studies
Langue et littérature françaises - Léttres
Langue et littérature françaises - Léttres et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Langue et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Langue française
Langue et littérature françaises - Théorie et critique littérraires
Geographical Information Systems - see Geography.
Geography
German Language - see German Studies
German Literature - see German Studies
German Literature and Culture in Translation - see German Studies.
Hispanic Languages - see Hispanic Studies.
History
History and Philosophy of Science
Humanistic Studies
International Development Studies
Italian Studies
Italian Civilization - see Italian Studies
Jewish Law
Jewish Studies
Linguistics, Applied
Linguistics, Theoretical
Middle East Studies
Middle East Languages - see Middle East Studies.
Music
North American Studies
Philosophy
Pilosopphy and Western Religions
Political Science
Political Science: Canada/Québec
Comparative Politics - see Political Science.
International Relations - see Political Science.
Political Economy - see Political Science.
Politics, Law and Society - see Political Science.
South Asia - see Political Science.
Québec Studies
Russian - see Russian and Slavic Studies
Russian Civilization - see Russian and Slavic Studies
Scriptural Languages (see Religious Studies)
Social Studies of Medicine
Sociology
Spanish Literature and Culture - see Hispanic Studies
Spanish-American Literature and Culture - see Hispanic Studies
World Religions (see Religious Studies)
Women's Studies

12 Academic Programs

12.1 Anatomy and Cell Biology (ANAT)

Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry Building
3640 University Street, Room 1/48
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B2 
Telephone: (514) 398-6335
Website: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/anatomy 
Chair
John J.M. Bergeron
Emeritus Professors
Yves Clermont; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.C.S.
Dennis G. Osmond; B.Sc., M.B., Ch.B., D.Sc.(Brist.), M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., F.R.S.C.
H. Warshawsky; B.Sc.(Sir G.Wms), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Professors
Alain Beaudet; M.Sc., Ph.D., M.D.(Montr.) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Gary C. Bennett; B.A., B.Sc.(Sir G.Wms.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
John J.M. Bergeron; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D., D.Phil.(Oxon.)
James R. Brawer; B.S.(Tufts), Ph.D.(Harv.)
M. Burnier; M.D.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.(Brazil) (joint appoint. with Ophthalmology)
Louis Hermo; B.A.(Loyola), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Charles P. Leblond; M.D.(Paris), Ph.D.(Montr.), D.Sc.(Acad.), F.R.S., F.R.S.C.
Sandra C. Miller; B.Sc.(Sir G.Wm.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Carlos R. Morales; DVM.(U.N., Argentina), Ph.D.(McG.)
Barry I. Posner; M.D.(Man.), F.R.C.P.(C) (joint appoint. with Medicine)
Charles E. Smith; D.D.S., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Dentistry)
Associate Professors
Philip Barker; B.Sc.(S.Fraser), Ph.D.(Alta.) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Orest W. Blaschuk; B.Sc.(Winn.), M.Sc.(Manit.), Ph.D.(Tor.) (joint appoint. with Surgery)
Eugene Daniels; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Man.)
Samuel David; Ph.D.(Man.) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Elaine Davis; B.Sc., M.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Timothy Kennedy; B.Sc.(McM.), M.Phil, Ph.D.(Columbia) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Antonis E. Koromilas; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Aristotelian U., Greece) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Paul F. Lasko; A.B.(Harv.), Ph.D.(M.I.T) (joint appoint. with Biology)
Martin Laterich; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Durham)
Marc D. McKee; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG) (joint appoint. with Dentistry)
Peter McPherson; B.Sc.(Manit.), Ph.D.(Iowa) (William Dawson Scholar) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Alfredo Riberio-da-Silva; M.D., Ph.D.(Oporto) (joint appoint. with Pharmacology and Therapeutics)
Hojatollah Vali; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich) (joint appoint. with Earth and Planetary Sciences)
Dominique Walker; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Geneva) (joint appoint. with Psychiatry)
Assistant Professors
Chantel Autexier; B.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(McG.)
Fiona Bedford; B.Sc.(Birm.), Ph.D.(Lond.)
Eric Chevet; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Paris) (joint appoint. with Surgery)
Michael T. Greenwood; B.Sc.,M.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(McG) (joint appoint. with Medicine)
Nathalie Lamarche; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Montr.)
Craig Mandato; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Wat.)
John F. Presley; B.A., Ph.D.(Texas)
Wayne Sossin; S.B.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(Stan.) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Stefano Stifani; Ph.D.(Rome), Ph.D.(Alta.) (joint appoint. with Neurology & Neurosurgery)
Gary E. Wild; B.Sc., Ph.D., M.D.,C.M.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Medicine)
Associate Member
David Y. Thomas (Biochemistry)
Adjunct Professors
Daniel Cyr; B.Sc., M.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Manit.)
Jacques Drouin; B.Sc., D.Sc.(Laval)
Sadayuki Inoue; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Hok. U.)
André Nantel; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Laval), Ph.D.(Chapel Hill)
Jackson G. Snipes; Ph.D., M.D.(Vanderbilt)

The Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology offers courses which deal with cell biology, histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, and gross anatomy. The Honours Program is designed as the first phase in the training of career cell and molecular biologists. The Major and Faculty programs offer decreasing levels of specialization in Anatomy and Cell Biology but with a broader base in other biological sciences. These programs also form a sound background for graduate studies in Anatomy and Cell Biology, or for further professional training in schools of medicine, dentistry and other health sciences. A B.Sc. in Anatomy and Cell Biology provides an excellent preparation for technical and administrative positions in laboratories of universities, research institutions, hospitals and pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries.

The Department is equipped to perform cell fractionation, protein purification, recombinant DNA technology, micro-injection of molecules into single cells, cytochemical, immunocytochemical and fluorescent analysis and electron microscopy, proteomics and genomics. The Department has a well-equipped centre for electron microscopy as well as a centre for confocal and immunofluorescence.
Inquiries about programs should be directed to the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

A Science Major Concentration in Biomedical Sciences is available to students pursuing the B.A. & Sc. degree. This Major Concentration is described in the Bachelor of Arts and Science section of the Calendar; see Biomedical Sciences for details.

FACULTY PROGRAM IN ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY
(57 credits)
Required Courses
(39 credits)
ANAT 212
(3)
Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function
ANAT 214
(3)
Systemic Human Anatomy
ANAT 261
(4)
Introduction to Dynamic Histology
(must be taken in U1)
ANAT 262
(3)
Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology
ANAT 321
(3)
Circuitry of the Human Brain
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
CHEM 212*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 222*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 2
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
MATH 203*
(3)
Principles of Statistics 1
or PSYC 204
(3)
Introduction to Psychological Statistics
or BIOL 373
(3)
Biometry

* If the equivalents to these courses were passed in CEGEP, they are not required for the Anatomy and Cell Biology programs, and may not be re-taken at McGill. Students must take the equivalent number of credits in Elective Courses to satisfy the total credit requirement for their degree.

Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
6 credits selected from:
ANAT 322
(3)
Neuroendocrinology
ANAT 365
(3)
Cell Biology: Secretory Process
ANAT 381
(3)
Basis of Embryology
ANAT 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signaling

12 credits selected from biologically oriented courses (BOC) in the following list:

BIOL 300, BIOL 301, BIOL 303, BIOL 306, BIOL 313, BIOL 314, 
BIOL 357, BIOL 370, BIOL 389, BIOL 468, BIOL 475, 
BIOL 516, BIOL 518, BIOL 520, BIOL 522, BIOL 524, 
BIOL 530, BIOL 531, BIOL 532, BIOL 544, BIOL 551, 
BIOL 572, BIOL 588. 
ANAT 322, ANAT 365, ANAT 381, ANAT 432, 
ANAT 458/BIOC 458, ANAT 541;  
BIOC 311, BIOC 312, BIOC 450, BIOC 454, BIOC 455, 
BIOC 503.  
BIOT 505. 
EXMD 401, EXMD 502, EXMD 503, EXMD 504, EXMD 506, 
EXMD 507, EXMD 508, EXMD 509, EXMD 510, EXMD 512D1/ 
EXMD 512D2. 
MIMM 314, MIMM 323, MIMM 324, MIMM 386D1/MIMM 386D2, 
MIMM 387, MIMM 413, MIMM 414, MIMM 465, MIMM 466, 
MIMM 509. 
NEUR 310. 
NUTR 307. 
PATH 300. 
PHAR 300, PHAR 301, PHAR 303, PHAR 562, PHAR 563. 
PHGY 311, PHGY 312, PHGY 313, PHGY 314, PHGY 451, 
PHGY 502, PHGY 508, PHGY 513, PHGY 515, PHGY 516, 
PHGY 517, PHGY 518, PHGY 552, PHGY 556. 
PSYT 500. 
MAJOR IN ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY

(69 credits)
Required Courses
(48 credits)
all Faculty Program required courses, plus:
BIOL 301
(4)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
PHGY 212D1
(1)
Introductory Physiology Laboratory
PHGY 212D2
(1)
Introductory Physiology Laboratory
Complementary Courses
(21 credits)
9 credits selected from:
ANAT 322
(3)
Neuroendocrinology
ANAT 365
(3)
Cell Biology: Secretory Process
ANAT 381
(3)
Basis of Embryology
ANAT 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signaling
12 credits of biologically oriented courses (BOC), as defined in the Faculty Program.
HONOURS IN ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY
(81 credits)

Students should register at the Major level in U1 and, if accepted, may enter the Honours Program at the beginning of U2. To enter the program, the student must obtain a CGPA of at least 3.00 at the end of U1. For promotion to the U3 year of the Honours program, or for entry into the program at this level, the student must have a CGPA of at least 3.20 at the end of their U2 year. It is expected that at the beginning of the third year the students who wish to continue in the Honours Program will be those who feel that they are seriously interested in a career in Cell Biology. The Honours Degree will be recommended after successful completion of the Program with a CGPA of at least 3.20.

Required Courses
(78 credits)
all Major Program required courses, plus:
ANAT 322
(3)
Neuroendocrinology
ANAT 365
(3)
Cell Biology: Secretory Process
ANAT 381
(3)
Basis of Embryology
ANAT 432
(9)
Research Project: Anatomical Science
ANAT 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signaling
ANAT 541
(3)
Cell and Molecular Biology of Aging
BIOC 311
(3)
Metabolic Biochemistry
BIOC 312
(3)
Biochemistry of Macromolecules
Complementary Courses
(3 credits)
3 credits of biologically oriented courses (BOC), as defined in the Faculty Program.

12.2 Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (ATOC)

Burnside Hall, Room 945
805 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6 
Telephone: (514) 398-3764
Fax: (514) 398-6115
E-mail: undergraduateinfo.aos@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/meteo 
Chair
John R. Gyakum
Emeritus Professors
Roddy R. Rogers; B.S.(Texas), S.M.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(N.Y.U.)
Edward J. Stansbury; M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Professors
Jacques F. Derome; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Mich.)
Henry G. Leighton; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Alta.)
Charles A. Lin; B.Sc.(U.B.C.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Lawrence A. Mysak; B.Sc.(Alta.), M.Sc.(Adel.), A.M., Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C. (Canada Steamship Lines Professor of Meteorology)
Ronald E. Stewart; B.Sc.(Man.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Man Kong (Peter) Yau; S.B., S.M., Sc.D.(M.I.T.)
Isztar I. Zawadzki; B.Sc.(Buenos Aires), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Associate Professors
Peter Bartello; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Mathematics and Statistics)
John R. Gyakum; B.Sc.(Penn.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
David Straub; B.S., M.S.(SW Louisiana), Ph.D.(Wash)
Assistant Professor
Parisa Ariya; B.Sc., Ph.D.(York) (William Dawson Scholar) (joint appoint. with Chemistry)
Frédéric Fabry; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with McGill School of Environment)
Adjunct Professors
Gilbert Brunet, Pierre Gauthier, Stéphane Laroche, Richard Ménard, François Saucier, Ayrton Zadra

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences offers, at the undergraduate level, a broad range of courses and degree programs in atmospheric science. At the postgraduate level, programs of study are offered in physical oceanography, air-sea interaction, and climate research as well as in different branches of atmospheric science. The study of atmospheric science is based largely on physics and applied mathematics. All required courses except those at the introductory level generally have prerequisites or corequisites in physics, mathematics, and atmospheric science. One of the goals of the discipline is to develop the understanding necessary to improve our ability to predict the weather, but atmospheric science is more than weather forecasting.

Another important area of study focuses on the possible changes in global climate caused by the changing chemical composition of the atmosphere. The approach is always quantitative. Like other parts of physics, atmospheric science attempts to create theoretical models of its complex processes, as a means of analyzing the motion and composition of the air, its thermodynamic behaviour, and its interaction with radiation and with the solid or liquid surface beneath it.

From one viewpoint, the atmosphere may be studied as a large volume of gas by the methods of fluid mechanics: winds, circulation patterns, turbulence, and energy and momentum exchanges are the ideas employed in this approach. Alternatively, the atmosphere may be studied from the point of view of its detailed physics: how water condenses in the air, how cloud droplets make rain, how sunlight warms the ground and the ground warms the air above it by radiation and convection, and how the atmosphere and ocean interact to shape the weather and climate. A comprehensive understanding requires both viewpoints, and these are reflected in the curriculum.

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences offers four main programs in Atmospheric Science: Honours, Major, Minor, and a Joint Major in Atmospheric Science and Physics. The Honours program is meant for students with high standing. It is based on courses similar to those in the Major program, but provides the opportunity to take advanced optional courses. The Major program, although somewhat less intensive, satisfies the requirements for a professional career as a meteorologist, and like the Honours program equips the student to undertake postgraduate study in meteorology, atmospheric science, and related sciences (for example physical oceanography) at any of the leading universities. The Department also offers a special one-year Diploma program to B.Sc. or B.Eng. graduates.

A degree in Atmospheric Science can lead to a professional career in government service or private industry. The Meteorological Service of Canada has traditionally been the main employer of graduating students, but certain provincial governments and environmental consulting and engineering firms also employ graduates trained in atmospheric science. Positions in teaching and research are available to graduates with M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Students interested in any of the undergraduate programs should consult the Undergraduate Adviser, Room 946, Burnside Hall.

Internship Year for Engineering and Science (IYES)

IYES is a pre-graduate work experience program available to eligible students and normally taken between their U2 and U3 years. For more information, see IYES: Internship Year for Engineering and Science.

The following programs are also available with an Internship component:
Major in Atmospheric Science
Honours in Atmospheric Science

A Science Major Concentration in Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences is available to students pursuing the B.A. & Sc. degree. This Major Concentration is described in the Bachelor of Arts and Science section of the Calendar; see Earth, Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences for details.

MINOR IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
(18 credits)

The Minor may be taken in conjunction with any program in the Faculty of Science.

Required Courses
(15 credits)
ATOC 214
(3)
Introduction: Physics of the Atmosphere
ATOC 215
(3)
Oceans, Weather and Climate
ATOC 219
(3)
Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
or CHEM 219
(3)
Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
ATOC 309
(3)
Weather Radars and Satellites
ATOC 315
(3)
Water in the Atmosphere
Complementary Course
(3 credits)
ATOC 412
(3)
Atmospheric Dynamics
or ATOC 540
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 1
MAJOR IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
(61 credits)
Required Courses
(46 credits)
ATOC 214
(3)
Introduction: Physics of the Atmosphere
ATOC 215
(3)
Oceans, Weather and Climate
ATOC 309
(3)
Weather Radars and Satellites
ATOC 315
(3)
Water in the Atmosphere
ATOC 412
(3)
Atmospheric Dynamics
ATOC 540
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 1
ATOC 541
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 2
ATOC 546

(1)

Current Weather Discussion

COMP 208
(3)
Computers in Engineering
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 223
(3)
Linear Algebra
MATH 314
(3)
Advanced Calculus
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
PHYS 230
(3)
Dynamics of Simple Systems
PHYS 232
(3)
Heat and Waves
PHYS 257
(3)
Experimental Methods 1
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
3-6 credits to satisfy a statistics requirement, usually:
MATH 203
(3)
Principles of Statistics 1
or MATH 323
(3)
Probability Theory
and MATH 324
(3)
Statistics
3 credits selected from:
PHYS 333
(3)
Thermal and Statistical Physics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
6-9 credits ordinarily selected from:
ATOC 419

(3)

Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere

or CHEM 419
(3)
Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere
ATOC 515
(3)
Turbulence in Atmosphere and Oceans
GEOG 322
(3)
Environmental Hydrology
GEOG 372
(3)
Running Water Environments
MATH 317
(3)
Numerical Analysis
MATH 319
(3)
Partial Differential Equations
MATH 423
(3)
Regression and Analysis of Variance
PHYS 241
(3)
Signal Processing
PHYS 331

(3)

Topics in Classical Mechanics

PHYS 332
(3)
Physics of Fluids
or MATH 555
(4)
Fluid Dynamics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342
(3)
Electromagnetic Waves
JOINT MAJOR IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE AND PHYSICS
(67 credits)

This Major provides a solid basis for postgraduate study in meteorology, atmospheric physics, or related fields, and the necessary preparation for embarking on a professional career as a meteorologist directly after the B.Sc.

The program is jointly administered by the Department of Physics and the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Students should consult undergraduate advisers in both departments.

Required Courses
(64 credits)
ATOC 214
(3)
Introduction: Physics of the Atmosphere
ATOC 215
(3)
Oceans, Weather and Climate
ATOC 309
(3)
Weather Radars and Satellites
ATOC 315
(3)
Water in the Atmosphere
ATOC 412
(3)
Atmospheric Dynamics
ATOC 540
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 1
ATOC 541
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 2
ATOC 546
(1)
Current Weather Discussion
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 223
(3)
Linear Algebra
MATH 314
(3)
Advanced Calculus
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
PHYS 230
(3)
Dynamics of Simple Systems
PHYS 232
(3)
Heat and Waves
PHYS 257
(3)
Experimental Methods 1
PHYS 258
(3)
Experimental Methods 2
PHYS 331
(3)
Topics in Classical Mechanics
PHYS 333
(3)
Thermal and Statistical Physics
PHYS 339
(3)
Measurements Laboratory in General Physics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342
(3)
Electromagnetic Waves
PHYS 446
(3)
Quantum Physics
Complementary Course
(3 credits)
PHYS 434
(3)
Optics
or PHYS 439
(3)
Laboratory in Modern Physics
HONOURS IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
(70 credits)

Students can be admitted to the Honours program after completion of the U1 year of the Major in Atmospheric Science program with a minimum GPA of 3.30. Students having completed a U1 year in a different program with high standing may be admitted to the Honours program on the recommendation of the Department.

A minimum GPA of 3.30 in the Honours Program courses (taken as a whole) is required to remain in the program. A CGPA of 3.30 on the total program is also required to graduate with honours.

Required Courses
(52 credits)
ATOC 214
(3)
Introduction: Physics of the Atmosphere
ATOC 215
(3)
Oceans, Weather and Climate
ATOC 309
(3)
Weather Radars and Satellites
ATOC 315
(3)
Water in the Atmosphere
ATOC 480
(3)
Honours Research Project
ATOC 512
(3)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Dynamics
ATOC 530
(3)
Climate Dynamics 1
ATOC 540
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 1
ATOC 546
(1)
Current Weather Discussion
COMP 208
(3)
Computers in Engineering
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 223
(3)
Linear Algebra
MATH 314
(3)
Advanced Calculus
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
MATH 319
(3)
Partial Differential Equations
PHYS 230
(3)
Dynamics of Simple Systems
PHYS 232
(3)
Heat and Waves
PHYS 257
(3)
Experimental Methods 1
Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
3-6 credits to satisfy a statistics requirement, usually:
MATH 203
(3)
Principles of Statistics 1
or MATH 323
(3)
Probability Theory
and MATH 324
(3)
Statistics
3 credits selected from:
PHYS 333
(3)
Thermal and Statistical Physics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
3-6 credits ordinarily selected from:
ATOC 419
or CHEM 419
(3)
Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere
ATOC 515
(3)
Turbulence in Atmosphere and Oceans
MATH 317
(3)
Numerical Analysis
PHYS 241
(3)
Signal Processing
PHYS 331
(3)
Topics in Classical Mechanics
PHYS 332
(3)
Physics of Fluids
or MATH 555
(4)
Fluid Dynamics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342
(3)
Electromagnetic Waves
GEOG 322
(3)
Environmental Hydrology
GEOG 372
(3)
Running Water Environments
MATH 423
(3)
Regression and Analysis of Variance
6 credits selected from:
ATOC 513
(3)
Waves and Stability
ATOC 531
(3)
Climate Dynamics 2
ATOC 541
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 2
DIPLOMA IN METEOROLOGY
(30 credits)

The Department offers an intensive, one-year program in theoretical and applied meteorology to B.Sc. or B.Eng. graduates of suitable standing in physics, applied mathematics or other appropriate disciplines, leading to a Diploma in Meteorology. The program is designed for students with little or no previous background in meteorology who wish to direct their experience to atmospheric or environmental applications, or who need to fulfill academic prerequisites in meteorology to qualify for employment. For further information, consult the Administrative Officer, Burnside Hall, Room 946.

An exemption of up to 6 credits may be allowed for courses already taken. Students granted such exemptions are required to add complementary courses from an approved list to maintain a total credit count of 30 completed at McGill.

Required Courses
(18 credits)
ATOC 512
(3)
Atmospheric & Oceanic Dynamics
ATOC 513
(3)
Waves and Stability
ATOC 530
(3)
Climate Dynamics 1
ATOC 531
(3)
Climate Dynamics 2
ATOC 540
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 1
ATOC 541
(3)
Synoptic Meteorology 2
Complementary Courses
(12 credits)
6 credits selected from:
ATOC 309
(3)
Weather Radars and Satellites
ATOC 315
(3)
Water in the Atmosphere
ATOC 419
or CHEM 419
(3)

Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere

6 credits ordinarily selected from:
ATOC 515
(3)
Turbulence in Atmosphere and Oceans
GEOG 522
(3)
Advanced Environmental Hydrology
MATH 317
(3)
Numerical Analysis
MATH 319
(3)
Partial Differential Equations
PHYS 331
(3)
Topics in Classical Mechanics
PHYS 340
(3)
Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342
(3)
Electromagnetic Waves
PHYS 332
(3)
Physics of Fluids
or MATH 555
(4)
Fluid Dynamics

12.3 Biochemistry (BIOC)

McIntyre Medical Sciences Building, Room 802
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler
Montreal, QC  H3G 1Y6 
Telephone: (514) 398-1898
Fax: (514) 398-7384
E-mail: rachelle.leger@mcgill.ca
Website: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/biochem 
Chair
David Y. Thomas
Emeritus Professors
Angus F. Graham; M.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D., D.Sc.(Edin.), F.R.S.C.
Rose M. Johnstone; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Samuel Solomon; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Theodore L. Sourkes; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Corn.), F.R.S.C.
Professors
Rhoda Blostein; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Medicine)
Nicole Beauchemin; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Montr.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Philip E. Branton; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.) (Gilman Cheney Professor of Biochemistry)
Peter E. Braun; B.Sc.,M.Sc. (U.B.C.), Ph.D. (Berk.)
Vincent Giguère; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Laval) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Philippe Gros; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)
Annette A. Herscovics; B.Sc.,Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C. (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Robert E. MacKenzie; M.N.S., B.Sc.(Agr.)(McG.), Ph.D.(C'nell.)
Edward A. Meighen; B.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Berk.)
William Muller; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Walter E. Mushynski; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Morag Park; B.Sc.,Ph.D.(Glasgow) (William Dawson Scholar) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Jerry Pelletier; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Gordon C. Shore; B.Sc.(Guelph), Ph.D.(McG.)
Joseph Shuster; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Calif.), M.D.(Alta.) (joint appoint. with Medicine)
John R. Silvius; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Alta.)
Nahum Sonenberg; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Weizmann Inst.), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Clifford P. Stanners; B.Sc.(McM.), M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
David Y. Thomas; B.Sc.(Bristol), M.Sc.,Ph.D.(Univ. College, Lond.), F.R.S.C.
Michel L. Tremblay; B.Sc.,M.Sc.(Sher.), Ph.D.(McM.)
Maria Zannis-Hadjopoulos; B.Sc.,M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Associate Professors
Albert Berghuis; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Rijks Univ.Groningen, The Netherlands), Ph.D.(U.B.C.)
Kalle Gehring; M.Sc.(Mich.), Ph.D.(Berk.)
Alain Nepveu; B.Sc.,M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Sher.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Arnim Pause; B.Sc., M.Sc.(U. Konstanz, Germ.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
Maxime Bouchard; B.Sc, Ph.D.(Laval)
Imed Gallouzi; Matrise, DEA, Ph.D.(Montpellier,France)
Associate Members
Karine Auclair (Chemistry); John J. Bergeron (Anatomy & Cell Biology); Katherine Cianflone (Exp. Medicine, RVH); Mark S. Featherstone (Oncology); William C. Galley (Chemistry); Michael Hallett (Computer Science); Peter J. Roughley (Shriners Hospital); Erwin Schurr (Exp. Medicine, RVH); Charles Scriver (Pediatrics, MCH); Bernard Turcotte (Exp. Medicine, RVH); Simon Wing (Medicine); Xiang-Jiao Yang (Molecular Oncology, RVH)
Adjunct Professors
Prabhat Arya (NRC, Ottawa); Michael Cordingley (Boehringer-Ingelheim); Mirek Cygler (B.R.I.); Jacques Drouin (Clin. Res. Inst.); Karen Meerovitch (Phytobiotech); Donald Nicholson (Merck Frosst); Maureen D. O'Connor-McCourt (B.R.I.); Enrico Purisima (B.R.I.); Sophie Roy(Merck Frosst); Marc Therrien (Clin. Res. Inst.)

Biochemistry is the application of chemical, genetic, and biophysical approaches to the study of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. Biochemists are interested in the dynamic events that occur in cells, for example, in mechanisms of brain function; cellular differentiation; energy utilization by animals and microorganisms and in the molecular basis of inheritance and disease. The biochemist seeks to determine how specific molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins and hormones function in various cellular processes. Biochemists place particular emphasis on the regulation of reactions in living cells. The knowledge and methods developed by biochemists are applied in all fields of medicine, in agriculture and in many chemical and health- related industries. Biochemistry is unique in providing basic theoretical training as well as basic practical laboratory training and research in both enzymology and genetic engineering, the two basic components in the rapidly expanding field of Biotechnology.

Three programs are offered by the Department of Biochemistry. The Honours and Major programs provide a sound background for students who wish to have a professional career in biochemistry and can lead to post graduate studies and research careers in hospital, university or industrial laboratories. The Faculty program is less specialized offering students opportunities to select courses in other fields of interest.

During the first year, each program provides basic training in organic, physical and analytical chemistry as well as in biology and physiology. The Honours and Major programs become more specialized in biochemistry during the following two years with additional work in chemistry and biology.

Students interested in pursuing an ad hoc Joint Major or Joint Honours degree between Biochemistry and a second discipline may consult with our Chief Adviser.

The increasing involvement of complex technology in modern society requires personnel trained in both chemistry and biology. With the advent of biotechnology, the combination of chemistry, molecular biology, enzymology and genetic engineering found in the biochemistry program provides the essential background and training in this area as well. The biochemist is in an advantageous position to fulfill this role and assume a wide variety of positions in industry and the health field. These range from research and development in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries to testing as well as research in government and hospital laboratories to management. Many graduates take higher degrees in research and attain academic positions in universities and colleges.

PRE-PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Entrance requirements for the Faculty, Major and Honours programs are: 6 credits in elementary biology, 6 credits in general chemistry, 3 credits in organic chemistry, 6 credits in calculus, 8-9 credits in physics.

ADVISERS

New students interested in Biochemistry should call (514) 398-1898 for information regarding academic advising.

Returning Students

must schedule an advising appointment directly with the academic adviser assigned to them in their first year in Biochemistry.

A Science Major Concentration in Biomedical Sciences is available to students pursuing the B.A. & Sc. degree. This Major Concentration is described in the Bachelor of Arts and Science section of the Calendar; see Biomedical Sciences for details.

FACULTY PROGRAM IN BIOCHEMISTRY
(55 credits)
U1 Required Courses
(16 credits)
BIOC 212
(3)
Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
CHEM 204
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 1
CHEM 222
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 2
U1 Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
6 credits selected from:
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
3 credits selected from:
BIOL 373
(3)
Biometry
COMP 202
(3)
Introduction to Computing 1
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
PSYC 204
(3)
Introduction to Psychological Statistics
U2 Required Courses
(15 credits)
BIOC 300D1
(3)
Laboratory in Biochemistry
BIOC 300D2
(3)
Laboratory in Biochemistry
BIOC 311
(3)
Metabolic Biochemistry
BIOC 312
(3)
Biochemistry of Macromolecules
CHEM 302
(3)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 3
U2 Complementary Courses
(3 credits)
3 credits selected from:
ANAT 262
(3)
Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 313
(3)
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
U3 Complementary Courses
(12 credits)
at least 3 credits selected from:
BIOC 450
(3)
Protein Structure and Function
BIOC 454
(3)
Nucleic Acids
the remaining credits selected from the following list or the above:
ANAT 261
(4)
Introduction to Dynamic Histology
BIOC 404
(3)
Biophysical Chemistry
BIOC 455
(3)
Neurochemistry
BIOC 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signaling
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
BIOL 300
(3)
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 304
(3)
Evolution
BIOL 314
(3)
Molecular Biology of Oncogenes
CHEM 214
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 2
CHEM 257D1
(2)
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 257D2
(2)
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 362
(2)
Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
CHEM 402
(3)
Advanced Bio-organic Chemistry
CHEM 572
(3)
Synthetic Organic Chemistry
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
PHAR 300
(3)
Drug Action
PHAR 301
(3)
Drugs and Disease
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
MAJOR IN BIOCHEMISTRY
(67 or 70 credits)

Students may transfer into the Major program at any time provided they have met all course requirements.

U1 Required Courses
(20 credits)
BIOC 212
(3)
Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
CHEM 204
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 1
CHEM 222
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 2
CHEM 257D1
(2)
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 257D2
(2)
Introductory Analytical Chemistry
U1 Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
6 credits, selected from:
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
3 credits selected from:
BIOL 309
(3)
Mathematical Models in Biology
BIOL 373
(3)
Biometry
COMP 202
(3)
Introduction to Computing 1
MATH 203
(3)
Principles of Statistics 1
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
PSYC 204
(3)
Introduction to Psychological Statistics
U2 Required Courses
(23 credits)
all Faculty Program U2 Required Courses, plus:
ANAT 262
(3)
Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology
CHEM 214
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 2
CHEM 362
(2)
Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
U2 Complementary Courses
(3 credits)
3 credits selected from:
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 313
(3)
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
U3 Required Courses
(6 credits)
BIOC 450
(3)
Protein Structure and Function
BIOC 454
(3)
Nucleic Acids
U3 Complementary Courses
(6 or 9* credits)
at least 3 credits selected from:
BIOC 404
(3)
Biophysical Chemistry
BIOC 455
(3)
Neurochemistry
BIOC 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signalling
BIOC 460*
(6)
Advanced Lab in Biochemistry
BIOC 503
(3)
Immunochemistry
the remainder, if any, to be selected from the following list:
BIOL 300
(3)
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 304
(3)
Evolution
BIOL 313
(3)
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
BIOL 314
(3)
Molecular Biology of Oncogenes
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
CHEM 402
(3)
Advanced Bio-organic Chemistry
CHEM 552
(3)
Physical Organic Chemistry
CHEM 572
(3)
Synthetic Organic Chemistry
EXMD 502
(3)
Advanced Endocrinology
EXMD 503
(3)
Advanced Endocrinology
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
MIMM 324
(3)
Fundamental Virology
PHAR 300
(3)
Drug Action
PHAR 301
(3)
Drugs and Disease
PHGY 311
(3)
Intermediate Physiology 1
PHGY 312
(3)
Intermediate Physiology 2
* Students who are given special permission to take BIOC 460 are required to complete 9 credits of complementary courses in U3.
HONOURS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
(76 credits)

Admission to the Honours program will not be granted until U2. Students who wish to enter the Honours program in U2 should follow the U1 Major program. Those who satisfactorily complete the U1 Major program with a GPA of at least 3.20 and a mark of B or B- or better in every required course are eligible for admission to the Honours program.

Students seeking admission to the Honours program must obtain permission from the Student Affairs Officer during the Add/Drop period in September of their second year.

Promotion to U3 year is based on satisfactory completion of U2 courses with a GPA of at least 3.20 and a B in every required course. In borderline cases, the marks received in BIOC 311 and BIOC 312 will be of particular importance for continuation in the U3 Honours year.

For graduation in the Honours program, the student must complete a minimum of 90 credits, pass all required courses with no grade less than B, and achieve a CGPA of at least 3.20.

U1 Required Courses
(20 credits)
as for the Major Program U1
U1 Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
as for the Major Program U1
U2 Required Courses
(23 credits)
as for the Major Program U2
U2 Complementary Courses
(3 credits)
as for the Major Program U2
U3 Required Courses
(15 credits)
BIOC 404
(3)
Biophysical Chemistry
BIOC 450
(3)
Protein Structure and Function
BIOC 454
(3)
Nucleic Acids
BIOC 460
(6)
Advanced Lab in Biochemistry
U3 Complementary Courses
(6 credits)
at least 3 credits selected from:
BIOC 455
(3)
Neurochemistry
BIOC 458
(3)
Membranes and Cellular Signaling
BIOC 491
(6)
Independent Research
BIOC 503
(3)
Immunochemistry
the remainder, if any, to be selected from the following list:
BIOL 300
(3)
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 304
(3)
Evolution
BIOL 313
(3)
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
BIOL 314
(3)
Molecular Biology of Oncogenes
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
CHEM 402
(3)
Advanced Bio-organic Chemistry
CHEM 552
(3)
Physical Organic Chemistry
CHEM 572
(3)
Synthetic Organic Chemistry
EXMD 502
(3)
Advanced Endocrinology
EXMD 503
(3)
Advanced Endocrinology
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
MIMM 324
(3)
Fundamental Virology
PHAR 300
(3)
Drug Action
PHAR 301
(3)
Drugs and Disease
PHGY 311
(3)
Intermediate Physiology 1
PHGY 312
(3)
Intermediate Physiology 2

INTERDEPARTMENTAL HONOURS IN IMMUNOLOGY, . This program is offered by the Departments of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, and Physiology.

12.4 Biology (BIOL)

Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W4-7
1205 Avenue Docteur Penfield
Montreal, QC  H3A 1B1 
Telephone: (514) 398-6400
Fax: (514) 398-5069
Website: www.mcgill.ca/biology 
Chair
Paul F. Lasko
Emeritus Professors
Robert L. Carroll; B.S. (Mich), M.A., Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C.
Clark Fraser; O.C., B.Sc.(Acadia), M.Sc., Ph.D., M.D.(McG.), D.Sc.(Acadia), F.R.C.P.(C), F.R.S.C. (Molson Emeritus Professor of Genetics) (joint appoint. with Human Genetics)
Sarah P. Gibbs; A.B., M.S.(C'nell), Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C. (Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Botany)
Jacob Kalff; M.S.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Ind.)
John B. Lewis; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Gordon A. Maclachlan; B.Sc.(Sask.), Ph.D.(Manit.) (Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Botany)
Barid B. Mukherjee; B.Sc.(Calc.), M.S.(Brig.Young), Ph.D.(Utah) (joint appoint. with Human Genetics)
Rolf Sattler; B.Sc.(Tubingen), Ph.D.(Munich), F.R.S.C.
Professors
Graham A.C. Bell; B.A., D.Phil.(Oxon.), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Gregory G. Brown; B.Sc.(Notre Dame), Ph.D.(N.Y.)
A. Howard Bussey; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Brist.), F.R.S.C.
Ronald Chase; A.B.(Stan.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Rajinder S. Dhindsa; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Punj.), Ph.D.(Wash.)
Donald L. Kramer; B.Sc.(Boston Coll.), Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
Paul F. Lasko; A.B.(Harv.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.) (Molson Professor of Genetics) (joint appoint. with Anatomy & Cell Biology)
Martin Lechowicz; B.A.(Mich. State), M.S., Ph.D.(Wis.)
Louis Lefebvre; B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D.(Montr.)
Catherine Potvin; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Duke)
Rima Rozen; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)
Daniel J. Schoen; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Mich.), Ph.D.(Calif.) (Macdonald Professor of Botany) (on leave)
Associate Professors
Thomas Bureau; B.Sc.(Calif.), Ph.D.(Texas) (William Dawson Scholar)
François Fagotto; Ph.D.(Neuchâtel)
Gregor Fussman; Diploma (Berlin), Ph.D.(Max-Planck-Institute)
Andrew Gonzalez; B.Sc.(Univ. Nottingham), Ph.D.(Imperial College, Univ. London)
Siegfried Hekimi, M.Sc., Ph.D.(Geneva)
Robert L. Levine; B.Sc.(Brooklyn), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Yale)
Gerald S. Pollack; M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.)
Neil M. Price; B.Sc.(New Br.), Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
Beat Suter; Dip., Ph.D.(Zür.) (on leave)
Assistant Professors
Ehab Abouheif; M.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Duke) (on leave)
Joseph A. Dent; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Colo.)
Irene Gregory-Eaves; B.Sc.(Vic., B.C.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Queen's)
Frédéric Guichard; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Laval)
Christian Hardtke; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich)
Paul Harrison; B.Sc.(National Univ. of Ireland), Ph.D.(University of London)
Andrew Hendry; B.Sc.(Vic.,B.C.) M.Sc., Ph.D.(Wash.)
Rudiger Krahe; Diploma (Alexander University), Ph.D.(Humboldt University)
Hans Larsson; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Chic.)
Laura Nilson; B.A.(Colgate), Ph.D.(Yale) (Canada Research Chair in Developmental Genetics)
Richard Roy; B.Sc.(Bishop's), Ph.D.(Laval)
Frieder Schoeck; Diploma (Erhangen), Ph.D.(Max-Planck-Institute)
Jacalyn Vogel; M.Sc.(E.Ill.), Ph.D.(Kansas)
Tamara Western; B.Sc.(Dal), Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
Monique Zetka; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
Associate Members
Allan Memorial Institute: Roberta Palmour
Biochemistry: David Y.Thomas
MGH: Sal Carbonetto, Pierre Drapeau, Guy Rouleau
MNI: Kenneth Hastings, Paul Holland
Neurology and Neurosurgery: Michael Ferns
Neuroscience: Robert Dunn
Chair, Dept. of Human Genetics: David Rosenblatt
RVH: Hugh J. Clarke, Teruko Taketo
Redpath Museum: David Green, Anthony Ricciardi
Adjunct Professors
DNA Landmarks: Benoit S. Landry
NRC Lab: Malcolm S. Whiteway
STRI: Eldredge Bermingham, Allen Herre, William F. Laurance
U. West Indies: Wayne Hunte

Biology is the study of living things at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. It deals with fundamental questions such as the origin and evolution of plants and animals, interactions between living organisms and their environment, mechanisms of embryonic development, structure and function of the living cell and its organelles, molecular basis of inheritance, biochemical and genetic basis of human diseases, and the operation of the brain and the nervous system. The study of biology also has vast practical applications. The knowledge, methods and concepts developed through research in the various fields of biology are applied extensively in agriculture, medicine, biotechnology, genetic engineering, environmental protection and wildlife management.

The Department of Biology offers two Faculty Programs, a Major Program, an Honours Program, a Minor Program and a Minor Concentration in Science for Arts students. The details of these programs are given below.

The prerequisites for Biology programs include, in addition to the minimum requirements for admission to the Faculty of Science, an additional Biology and one course in Organic Chemistry. Students who have a DEC in Science but lack either of these courses must take them as extra requirements. It is advisable to take the additional CEGEP Biology in advance, if possible. The two Biology courses together prepare students for the Biology Program at McGill. Note that an introductory course in Cell and Molecular Biology (BIOL 112) is offered in the summer at McGill.

The programs in Biology offer students an opportunity to specialize in more than one area of biology and provide them with a broad training in biology as compared to the more specialized programs in Biochemistry, Microbiology, Physiology and Anatomy. A B.Sc. degree in Biology, therefore, prepares students for a wide range of employment opportunities, including entry to professional schools in medicine, veterinary science, dentistry, agriculture, nursing, education and library science. It also provides solid background for those interested in careers related to environmental protection, wildlife management, biotechnology and genetic engineering. A B.Sc. degree in Biology can also lead to post-graduate studies and research careers in universities, research institutes, hospitals, and industrial or governmental laboratories.

The Department of Biology has well-equipped teaching and research laboratories and its academic staff members, research associates, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students carry out research in areas of molecular biology, human genetics, ecology, animal behaviour, developmental biology, neurobiology, marine biology, plant biology, and evolution. Its teaching and research resources are extended by the Redpath Museum; the Montreal Children's, Jewish General, Montreal General, Royal Victoria and Shriners Hospitals; Macdonald Campus; Montreal Neurological Institute; and the Sheldon Biotechnology Centre. For courses taught in the field, the stations at the Gault Nature Reserve, the Morgan Arboretum, the Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, the Huntsman Marine Science Centre in New Brunswick, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama are used. In addition, field stations near Lake Memphremagog and at Schefferville in northern Quebec are available for research projects.

The Department of Biology Undergraduate Programs 2004-2005 booklet ("Blue Book") describes in detail the content of each course and the level at which it is given, the aims and methods used, lectures, references, grading procedures, etc. The "Blue Book" also contains more information on registration, counselling, committee structure and the research interests and facilities which are represented in the Department. It is available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/biology/undergrad/bluebook.html or for sale in the Biology Department, Room W4/8.

Inquiries about undergraduate programs should be directed to the Undergraduate Affairs Office, in Room W4/8, Stewart Biological Sciences Building, telephone (514) 398-7045.

Two Science Major Concentrations in Biology (Organismal Option and Cell/Molecular Option) are available to students pursuing the B.A. & Sc. degree. These Major Concentrations are described in the Bachelor of Arts and Science section of the Calendar; see Biology (BIOL) for details.

MINOR IN BIOLOGY
(24 credits)

The Minor in Biology may be taken in conjunction with any primary program in the Faculty of Science (other than programs offered by the Department of Biology). Students are advised to consult the Undergraduate Adviser in Biology as early as possible (preferably during their first year), in order to plan their course selection.
Six credits of overlap are allowed between the Minor and the primary program.

Required Courses
(15 credits)
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
BIOL 215
(3)
Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
Complementary Courses
(9 credits)

9 credits to be chosen from the Biology Department's course offerings, at the 300 level or above.

FACULTY PROGRAMS

In view of the constantly changing job market for B.Sc. graduates in biology, the Department has designed Faculty Programs to allow students to prepare for a wide range of employment opportunities. These programs offer students an opportunity to specialize in more than one area of biology, to broaden the scope of their scientific background. These programs can be tailored to provide a relatively broad spectrum of biology courses, or provide a degree of specialization in biology which approaches that of a Major Program. The flexibility and scope of these programs will not only enhance the graduate's prospects for employment, but also entrance into graduate studies.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
Required Courses
(15 credits)
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
BIOL 215
(3)
Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
Complementary Courses
(39 or 40 credits)
21 or 22 credits of Biology courses, including
3 or 4 credits selected from:
BIOL 206
(3)
Methods in Biology of Organisms
BIOL 301
(4)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
18 credits of Science courses including, at most, 3 credits of general interest Science courses (not listed in Science Major Programs).
Of the Complementary courses at least 6 of the 18 remaining Biology credits and 6 of the 18 Science credits must be above the 200-level, none may be at the 100-level; all are to be approved by the adviser.
--------------------------------END OF REVISION------------------------
FACULTY PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY AND MATHEMATICS
(57 credits)
Required Courses
(21 credits)
COMP 202
(3)
Introduction to Computing 1
MATH 133
(3)
Vectors, Matrices and Geometry
MATH 222
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 223
(3)
Linear Algebra
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
MATH 323
(3)
Probability Theory
MATH 324
(3)
Statistics
Complementary Courses
(36 credits)
21 credits in Biology including
12 credits selected from:
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
BIOL 206
(3)
Methods in Biology of Organisms
BIOL 215
(3)
Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
and 9 credits selected from:
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 306
(3)
Neurobiology and Behaviour
BIOL 307
(3)
Behavioural Ecology/Sociobiology
BIOL 324
(3)
Ecological Genetics
BIOL 370
(3)
Human Genetics Applied
BIOL 473
(3)
Ecology of Aquatic Invertebrates
BIOL 520
(3)
Gene Activity in Development
BIOL 530
(3)
Neural Basis of Behaviour
BIOL 531
(3)
Neurobiology Learning Memory
6 credits of any other Biological Sciences courses
9 credits of Mathematics
including at least 3 credits selected from:
BIOL 309
(3)
Mathematical Models in Biology
MATH 437
(3)
Mathematical Methods in Biology
PHYS 413
(3)
Physical Basis of Physiology
and at least 3 credits selected from:
MATH 314
(3)
Advanced Calculus
MATH 317
(3)
Numerical Analysis
MATH 319
(3)
Partial Differential Equations
MATH 327
(3)
Matrix Numerical Analysis
MATH 407
(3)
Dynamic Programming
MATH 423
(3)
Regression and Analysis of Variance
MATH 447
(3)
Stochastic Processes
or other suitable mathematics courses chosen in consultation with the adviser.

Advisers: Drs. M. Mackey and L. Glass (Department of Physiology)

MAJOR IN BIOLOGY
(55 credits)

The Major requires 55 credits comprising 34 as specified below and 21 additional credits which are to be chosen by students in consultation with their adviser.

U1 Required Courses
(18 credits)
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 205
(3)
Biology of Organisms
BIOL 206
(3)
Methods in Biology of Organisms
BIOL 215
(3)
Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
U2 or U3 Required Courses
(4 credits)
BIOL 301
(4)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
U2 or U3 Complementary Courses
(12 credits)
12 credits selected from:
BIOL 300
(3)
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 304
(3)
Evolution
BIOL 306
(3)
Neurobiology and Behaviour
BIOL 308
(3)
Ecological Dynamics
Other Complementary Courses
(21 credits)

To be selected in consultation with the student's adviser. All courses must be at the 300 level or higher; they are to include any seven Biology courses of which at most three may be substituted, given the adviser's consent, with science courses offered by other departments. Unless required by the Major Program, prerequisites for these courses must be taken as electives.

BIOLOGY CONCENTRATIONS

The concentrations set out below are only guidelines for specialized training. They do not constitute sets of requirements. Students interested in advanced studies in any biological discipline are strongly advised to develop their skills in computing as appropriate. As an aid to students wishing to specialize, the concentrations list key and other suggested courses by discipline.

Animal Behaviour Concentration

Understanding the diverse ways in which animals feed, mate, care for their offspring, avoid predators, select their habitats, communicate, and process information constitute the subject matter of behaviour. Several approaches are used to study these questions. Some focus on ecological consequences and determinants, some on physiological, genetic and developmental mechanisms, others on evolutionary origins.

Key courses:
BIOL 304, BIOL 305, BIOL 306, BIOL 307, BIOL 331 or BIOL 334 or another field course with a significant behavioural component, BIOL 373.

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 377, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477, BIOL 478

Since animal behaviour builds upon the fields of behaviour, ecology, and evolutionary biology, most courses from these fields will be relevant. Some courses that focus on a particular taxonomic group such as birds (Natural Resource Sciences WILD 420), amphibians and reptiles (BIOL 327) and marine mammals (BIOL 335) include a significant amount of behaviour.

Biological Diversity and Systematics

The study of biological diversity deals with the maintenance, emergence, and history of the inexhaustible variety of different kinds of organisms. It is deeply concerned with the particular characteristics of different organisms and therefore emphasizes the detailed study of particular groups and forms the basis of comparative biology. Our knowledge of diversity is organized through the study of systematics which seeks to understand the history of life and the phylogenetic and genetic relationships of living things. Appreciation and knowledge of diversity and systematics are essential in ecology and evolutionary biology and underlie all work in resource utilization and conservation biology.

Key course:
BIOL 304, BIOL 305, BIOL 373

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 240, BIOL 324, BIOL 327, BIOL 328, BIOL 329, BIOL 331 or BIOL 334, BIOL 335, BIOL 341, BIOL 350, BIOL 352, BIOL 358, BIOL 465, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477 or BIOL 478, BIOL 505, BIOL 555, BIOL 569, BIOL 594

Macdonald Campus:
PLNT 358, PLNT 451; ENTO 440; WILD 350, WILD 420; ZOOL 307, ZOOL 312, ZOOL 313, ZOOL 424

Evolutionary Biology Concentration

Evolutionary Biology is the study of processes that change organisms and their characteristics through time. Evolutionary biologists are concerned with adaptations of organisms and the process of natural selection.

Key courses:
BIOL 304, BIOL 305, BIOL 307, BIOL 324, BIOL 331, BIOL 352, BIOL 373, BIOL 435, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477 or BIOL 478, BIOL 555, BIOL 569, BIOL 570, BIOL 571, BIOL 572, BIOL 594

Other suggested courses in Organismal Biology:
BIOL 240, BIOL 327, BIOL 328, BIOL 335, BIOL 350, BIOL 358

Macdonald Campus: WILD 420

Genetics and Development: BIOL 300, BIOL 303

Ecology and Behaviour: BIOL 309, BIOL 329, BIOL 331, BIOL 341, BIOL 534

Experimental Plant Biology Concentration

Research interests span modern molecular genetics, plant physiology and biochemistry, plant ecology and genetics, plant morphogenesis, and the adaptation and evolution of plant form and function. Research is carried out in the field and in the Department's large, excellent controlled-environment facilities. The importance of adaptation to climate and the use of plants for food, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials underlie research using biotechnology and quantitative methods to improve cultivated plants and understand natural plant populations.

Key courses:
BIOL 300, BIOL 303, BIOL 305, BIOL 358, BIOL 373, BIOL 485

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 465, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477, BIOL 478, BIOL 555

Human Genetics Concentration

The courses recommended for students interested in Human Genetics are designed to offer a broad perspective in this rapidly advancing area of biology. Genetics is covered at all levels of organization (the gene, the chromosome, the cell, the organism and the population), using pertinent examples from all species, but with special emphasis on humans.

Key courses:
BIOL 301, BIOL 370, BIOL 373, BIOL 516, BIOL 520, BIOL 568, BIOL 575

Other suggested courses:
BIOC 311; BIOL 314, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477, BIOL 478, BIOL 551; CHEM 222, CHEM 203 or CHEM 204 and CHEM 214; MIMM 314

Molecular Genetics and Development Concentration

The discoveries that have fuelled the ongoing biomedical and biotechnological revolution have arisen at the intersection of a number of fields of biological investigation, including molecular biology, genetics, cellular and developmental biology and biochemistry. A substantial and significant quantity of this research has been conducted upon model eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast, nematode, the fruit fly, and the mustard weed, Arabidopsis. In the molecular genetics and development concentration students will obtain a comprehensive understanding of how the "model eukaryotes" have advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for cellular function and organismal development. Graduates from this concentration will be well prepared to pursue higher degrees in the fields of basic biology, biotechnology, and biomedicine or to assume a wide variety of positions in government, universities, and medical and industrial institutions.

Key courses:
BIOL 300, BIOL 301, BIOL 303, BIOL 373, BIOL 551, BIOL 569; CHEM 222, CHEM 203 or CHEM 204 and CHEM 214

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 313, BIOL 314, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477, BIOL 478, BIOL 516, BIOL 518, BIOL 520, BIOL 524, BIOL 544

Neurobiology Concentration

Nervous systems are perhaps the most complex entities in the natural world, being composed of up to trillions of interconnected cells that must operate in a coordinated manner to produce behaviour which can range from the mundane (e.g., regulation of heart rate) to the magnificent (e.g., musical composition). The Neurobiology discipline is one of the fastest growing areas of modern biology, seeks to understand the evolution, development, and operation of nervous systems. The Neurobiology concentration addresses these issues by examination of neural structure, function and development at levels of organization that range from the molecular to the organismal. As a result of exposure to a wide range of experimental and intellectual approaches, students receive a sound, broadly based education in biology.

Key courses:
BIOL 306, BIOL 373, BIOL 389, BIOL 530, BIOL 531, BIOL 532, BIOL 588

Other suggested courses:
ANAT 321, ANAT 322; BIOC 455; BIOL 300, BIOL 303, BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477, BIOL 478; NEUR 310; PHAR 562; PHGY 451, PHGY 520, PHGY 556; PSYC 311, PSYC 318, PSYC 342, PSYC 410, PSYC 470, PSYC 522; PSYT 500

CONCENTRATIONS AVAILABLE WITHIN THE AREA OF ECOLOGY

Ecology is the study of the interactions between organisms and environment that affect distribution, abundance, and other characteristics of the organisms. A strong analytical and quantitative orientation is common to all areas of ecology, and thus students wishing to specialize in these areas are strongly encouraged to develop their background in statistical analysis, computing, and mathematical modelling. Many of the ecology courses feature a strong analytical component, and students will find that background preparation in this area is very useful, if not essential. Ecology depends heavily on field research, and thus BIOL 331 and/or other field courses should be considered as vital to all concentrations in this area.

Aquatic Ecology Concentration

This concentration is designed to introduce the principles of ecology as they pertain to aquatic ecosystems and aquatic biota. Since it is essential to know how knowledge is obtained, as well as what has been learned, three of the courses (limnology, fish ecology, and aquatic invertebrate ecology) involve field components that stress the techniques used to study aquatic ecology. In addition, the concentration includes a field course in ecology. There is also a variety of courses in aquatic disciplines offered in other departments that complement the aquatic ecology courses offered in Biology.

Key courses:
BIOL 305, BIOL 308, BIOL 331 or another field course, BIOL 373, BIOL 432, BIOL 441, BIOL 442, BIOL 465; COMP 202 or COMP 273

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 307, BIOL 329, BIOL 534; GEOG 305, GEOG 306, GEOG 308, GEOG 322

Macdonald Campus:
ZOOL 315

General and Applied Ecology Concentration

The concentration in general and applied ecology is designed to introduce the breadth of contemporary ecology, at the levels of the ecosystem, communities and populations, and at the level of the individual organism, with an accent on the application of this science to practical problems in environmental management, and the management of resources and pests. In addition to general courses dealing with general principles, there is a selection of courses dealing with particular groups of organisms. Since it is essential to know how knowledge is obtained, the concentration includes a field course in ecology.

Key courses:
BIOL 305, BIOL 308, BIOL 331 or BIOL 334, BIOL 350, BIOL 373; COMP 202 or COMP 273

Other suggested courses:
BIOL 307, BIOL 324, BIOL 327, BIOL 328, BIOL 329, BIOL 432, BIOL 441, BIOL 442, BIOL 465, BIOL 534, BIOL 540, BIOL 571, BIOL 594; GEOG 302

Macdonald Campus: PLNT 451, PLNT 460

Marine Biology Concentration

This concentration is designed to offer students a broad introduction to Marine Biology and Marine Ecology which will form the basis for graduate studies in the fields, or to employment in Aquatic Biology and Oceanography.

Key courses:
ATOC 310; BIOL 305, BIOL 308, BIOL 335, BIOL 373, BIOL 441, BIOL 442

Other suggested courses:
ATOC 220, ATOC 512, ATOC 550, ATOC 551, ATOC 561; BIOL 329, BIOL 331, BIOL 334, BIOL 432, BIOL 465, BIOL 534; EPSC 542

For students intending to proceed to graduate work, one independent studies course (BIOL 471D1/BIOL 471D2, BIOL 477 or BIOL 478) is recommended. Because of the importance of numerical analyses in all fields of Ecology, courses in Biometry (e.g. BIOL 373) and Computer Science (COMP 202 or COMP 273) are recommended.

HONOURS IN BIOLOGY
(68 or 71 credits)

The Honours program in Biology is designed expressly as a preparation for graduate studies and research, and provides students with an enriched training in biology and some research experience in a chosen area. Acceptance into the Honours Program at the end of U2 requires a CGPA of 3.20 and approval of a 9- or 12-credit Independent Studies proposal (see listing of BIOL 479 and BIOL 480 for details). For an Honours degree, a minimum CGPA of 3.20 in the U3 year and adherence to the program as outlined below are the additional requirements.

U1 Required Courses
(18 credits)

as for the Major program

U2 and U3 Required Courses
(7 credits)
BIOL 301
(4)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
BIOL 373
(3)
Biometry
U2 and U3 Complementary Courses
(30 credits)
12 credits selected from:
BIOL 300
(3)
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 303
(3)
Developmental Biology
BIOL 304
(3)
Evolution
BIOL 306
(3)
Neurobiology and Behaviour
BIOL 308
(3)
Ecological Dynamics
18 credits in Biology at the 300 level or higher
U3 Required Courses
(4 credits)
BIOL 499D1
(2)
Honours Seminar in Biology
BIOL 499D2
(2)
Honours Seminar in Biology
U3 Complementary Courses
(9 or 12 credits)
either:
BIOL 479D1
(4.5)
Independent Studies in Biology
BIOL 479D2
(4.5)
Independent Studies in Biology
or:
   
BIOL 480D1
(6)
Independent Studies in Biology
BIOL 480D2
(6)
Independent Studies in Biology

Panama Field Study Semester, under the McGill School of Environment for details of the 15-credit interdisciplinary PFSS.

African Field Study Semester, under Geography for details of the 15-credit interdisciplinary AFSS. Note: The AFSS will only be offered in 2004-05 pending approval by the Dean of Science.

Also available is a Minor in Computational Molecular Biology under Computer Science.

12.5 Biotechnology (BIOT)

Sheldon Biotechnology Centre
Lyman-Duff Building 
Telephone: (514) 398-3998 
Program Supervisor
Professor Hugh P.J. Bennett; B.A.(York), Ph.D.(Brun.)

Biotechnology, the science of understanding, selecting and promoting useful organisms and specific gene products for commercial and therapeutic purposes, is the success story of this generation. It demands a broad comprehension of biology and engineering as well as detailed knowledge of at least one basic subject such as molecular genetics, protein chemistry, microbiology, or chemical engineering.

The Minor in Biotechnology is offered by the Faculties of Engineering and of Science, and students combine the Minor with the regular departmental Major (or Honours or Faculty) program. The Minor emphasizes an area relevant to biotechnology which is complementary to the main program.

Students should identify their interest in the Biotechnology Minor to their departmental academic adviser and to the Program Supervisor of the Minor and, at the time of registration for the U2 year, should declare their intent to embark on the Minor. Before registering for the Minor, and with the agreement of the academic adviser, students must submit their course list to the Program Supervisor who will certify that the student's complete program conforms to the requirements for the Minor. Students should ensure that they will have fulfilled the prerequisite requirements for the courses selected.

The BIOT course listed in the course section of this Calendar is considered as a course taught by the Faculty of Science.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

To obtain the Minor in Biotechnology the students must:

MINOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY
(24 credits)

PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS IN THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE*

Required Courses
(15 credits)
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
or BIOC 212
(3)
Molecular Mechanisms of Cell Function
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOT 505
(3)
Selected Topics in Biotechnology
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
Complementary Courses
(9 credits)

selected from courses outside the department of the main program, these may be taken from those listed as required courses for Engineering students. Alternatively, or in addition, courses may be taken from the lists below; in which case, at least three courses must be taken from one area of concentration as grouped.

* As 18 credits must be applied exclusively to the Minor, approved substitutions must be made for any of the specified courses which are part of the student's main program.

PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS IN THE FACULTY OF ENGINEERING*

Required Courses
(12 credits)
BIOT 505
(3)
Selected Topics in Biotechnology
CHEE 200
(3)
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
CHEE 204
(3)
Chemical Manufacturing Processes
CHEE 474
(3)
Biochemical Engineering
Complementary Courses
(12 credits)

selected from courses outside the department of the main program, these may be taken from those listed as required courses for Science students. Alternatively, or in addition, courses may be taken from the lists below; in which case, at least three courses must be taken from one area of concentration as grouped.

* As 18 credits must be applied exclusively to the Minor, approved substitutions must be made for any of the specified courses which are part of the student's main program.

Biomedicine
ANAT 541
Cell and Molecular Biology of Aging
EXMD 504
Biology of Cancer
PATH 300
Human Disease
Chemistry
CHEM 382
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products
CHEM 402
Advanced Bio-organic Chemistry
CHEM 552
Physical Organic Chemistry
Immunology
ANAT 261
Introduction to Dynamic Histology
BIOC 503
Immunochemistry
MIMM 314
Immunology
MIMM 414
Advanced Immunology
PHGY 513
Cellular Immunology
Management*
ECON 208
Microeconomics Analysis and Applications
MGCR 211
Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGCR 341
Finance 1
MGCR 352
Marketing Management 1
MGCR 472
Operations Management
* These courses may not also be used for a Management Minor, nor for complementary, by Engineering students.
Microbiology
MIMM 323
Microbial Physiology
MIMM 324
Fundamental Virology
MIMM 413
Parasitology
MIMM 465
Bacterial Pathogenesis
MIMM 466
Viral Pathogenesis
Molecular Biology (Biology)
BIOL 300
Molecular Biology of the Gene
BIOL 314
Molecular Biology of Oncogenes
BIOL 520
Gene Activity in Development
BIOL 551
Molecular Biology: Cell Cycle
BIOL 524
Topics in Molecular Biology
Molecular Biology (Biochemistry)
BIOC 311
Metabolic Biochemistry
BIOC 312
Biochemistry of Macromolecules
BIOC 450
Protein Structure and Function
BIOC 454
Nucleic Acids
BIOC 455
Neurochemistry
Physiology
EXMD 401
Physiology and Biochemistry Endocrine Systems
EXMD 502
Advanced Endocrinology
EXMD 503
Advanced Endocrinology
PHAR 562
General Pharmacology 1
PHAR 563
General Pharmacology 2
PHGY 517
Artificial Internal Organs
PHGY 518
Artificial Cells
Plant Biology
BIOL 357
Plant Physiology
BIOL 526
Plants and Extreme Environments
Pollution*
CHEE 471
Industrial Water Pollution Control
CIVE 225
Environmental Engineering
CIVE 430
Water Treatment and Pollution Control
CIVE 526
Solid Waste Management
CIVE 553
Stream Pollution and Control
* These courses may not also be used for an Environmental Engineering Minor by Engineering students.
General
MIME 310
Engineering Economy

12.6 Chemistry (CHEM)

Otto Maass Chemistry Building
801 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6 
Website: www.mcgill.ca/chemistry 
Departmental Office: Room 322. Telephone: (514) 398-6999
Student Advisory Office: Room 304. Telephone: (514) 398-3653
Website:  www.mcgill.ca/chemistry/advising 
Chair
R. Bruce Lennox
Emeritus Professors
Byung Chan Eu; B.Sc.(Seoul), Ph.D.(Brown)
John F. Harrod; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Birm.)
(Tomlinson Emeritus Professor of Chemistry)
Alan S. Hay; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Ill.), D.Sc.(Alta.), F.R.S., F.N.Y., Acad.Sci. (Tomlinson Emeritus Professor of Chemistry)
Mario Onyszchuk; B.Sc.(McG.), M.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cantab.)
Donald Patterson; M.Sc.(McG.), Doc.(St-Etienne) (Otto Maass Emeritus Professor of Chemistry)
Arthur S. Perlin; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
(E.B. Eddy Emeritus Professor of Industrial Chemistry)
William C. Purdy; B.A.(Amherst), Ph.D.(M.I.T.), F.C.I.C.
(William C. Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Chemistry)
Leon E. St-Pierre; B.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Notre Dame, Ind.), F.C.I.C.
Michael A. Whitehead; B.Sc., Ph.D. D.Sc.(Lond.), F.C.I.C.
Professors
D. Scott Bohle; B.A.(Reed College), M.Phil., Ph.D.(Auck.)
Ian S. Butler; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Brist.), F.C.I.C., C.Chem., F.R.S.C.(U.K.)
Tak-Hang Chan; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.), F.C.I.C., F.R.S.C. (Tomlinson Professor of Chemistry)
Masad J. Damha; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)
Adi Eisenberg; B.S.(Worcester Polytech.), M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.), F.C.I.C. (Otto Maass Professor of Chemistry)
Patrick G. Farrell; B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.(Exe.)
David N. Harpp; A.B.(Middlebury), M.A.(Wesleyan), Ph.D.(N.Carolina), F.C.I.C. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Chemistry)
George Just; Ing.Chem.(E.T.H. Zürich), Ph.D.(W.Ont.), F.C.I.C. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Chemistry)
R. Bruce Lennox; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
C.J. Li; B.Sc.(Zhengzhou), M.Sc.(C.A.S.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Robert H. Marchessault; B.Sc.(Loyola), Ph.D.(McG.), D.Sc. (C'dia), F.R.S.C. (E.B. Eddy Professor of Industrial Chemistry)
David Ronis; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Eric D. Salin; B.Sc.(Calif.), Ph.D.(Oreg.St.)
Bryan C. Sanctuary; B.Sc., Ph.D.(U.B.C.)
Alan G. Shaver; B.Sc.(Car.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Associate Professors
Mark P. Andrews; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Bruce Arndtsen; B.A.(Car.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
David H. Burns; B.Sc.(Puget Sound), Ph.D.(Wash)
William C. Galley; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Calif.)
James Gleason; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Virginia)
Ashok K. Kakkar; B.Sc. (Runjab), M.Sc. (H.P.U.), Ph.D.(Wat.)
Joan F. Power; B.Sc., Ph.D.(C'dia)
Linda Reven; B.A.(Car.), Ph.D.(Ill.)
Assistant Professors
Parisa Ariya; B.Sc., Ph.D.(York) (William Dawson Scholar) (joint appoint. with Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences)
Karine Auclair; B.Sc.(U.Q.A.C.), Ph.D.(Alta.)
Christopher J. Barrett; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Queen's)
Patanjali Kambhampati; B.A. (Carl.), Ph.D (Texas)
Nicolas Moitessier; Ph.D. (Nancy)
Hanadi Sleiman; B.Sc.(A.U.B.), Ph.D.(Stan.) (William Dawson Scholar)
Paul Wiseman; B.Sc.(St.F.X.), Ph.D.(W.Ont.) (joint appoint. with Physics)
Faculty Lecturers
John Finkenbine; B.S.(Capital), Ph.D.(McG.)
Grazyna Wilczek; M.Sc., Doctorate Chem. Sci.(Warsaw)
Associate Members
James A. Finch (Mining & Metallurical Engineering)
K. Gehring (Biochemistry)
P. Grütter (Physics)
Orval A. Mamer (University Clinic)
Barry I. Posner (Medicine)
Adjunct Professors
Dimitris Argyropoulos; B.Sc.(South Bank Poly.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Derek G. Gray; B.Sc. (Belf.), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Man.), F.C.I.C.
Yvan Guindon; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Montr.), F.C.I.C., F.R.S.C.
Romas Kazlauskas; B.Sc. (Clev.St.), Ph.D. (M.I.T.)
R. St. John Manley; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), D.Sc.(Uppsala)
Christian Reber; B.Sc., Ph.D. (Berne)
Youla Tsantrizos; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Theo G.M. van de Ven; Kand. Doc.(Utrecht), Ph.D.(McG.)
Ivor Wharf; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Lond.), A.R.C.S., D.I.C.
C.T. Yim; B.Sc.(Fu-Dan), Ph.D.(McG.)
Robert Zamboni; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)

Office for Science and Society

The Office for Science and Society is dedicated to the promotion of critical thinking and the presentation of practical scientific information to the public, educators and students in an accurate and responsible fashion. The Office answers queries from the public as well as from the media, with a view towards establishing scientific accuracy. The Office also offers a variety of educational and interesting presentations on scientific topics and its members contribute to a number of courses under the umbrella of "The World of Chemistry".

Director
Joseph A. Schwarcz; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Members
Ariel Fenster; L. ès S., D.E.A.(Paris), Ph.D.(McG.)
David N. Harpp; A.B.(Middlebury), M.A.(Wesleyan), Ph.D.(N.Carolina), F.C.I.C. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Chemistry)

Chemistry is both a pure science, offering a challenging intellectual pursuit, and an applied science whose technology is of fundamental importance to the economy and society. Modern chemists seek an understanding of the structure and properties of atoms and molecules to predict and interpret the properties and transformations of matter and the energy changes that accompany those transformations. Many of the concepts of physics and mathematics are basic to chemistry, while chemistry is of fundamental importance to many other disciplines such as the biological and medical sciences, geology, metallurgy, etc.

A degree in chemistry leads to a wide variety of professional vocations. The large science-based industries (petroleum refining, plastics, pharmaceuticals, etc.) all employ chemists in research, development and quality control. Many federal and provincial departments and agencies employ chemists in research and testing laboratories. Such positions are expected to increase with the currently growing concern for the environment and for consumer protection. A background in chemistry is also useful as a basis for advanced study in other related fields, such as medicine and the biological sciences. For a business career, a B.Sc. in Chemistry can profitably be combined with a master's degree in Business Administration, or a study of law for work as a patent lawyer or forensic scientist.

Chemistry courses at the university level are traditionally divided into four areas of specialization: 1) organic chemistry, dealing with the compounds of carbon; 2) inorganic chemistry, concerned with the chemistry and compounds of elements other than carbon; 3) analytical chemistry, which deals with the identification of substances and the quantitative measurement of their compositions; and 4) physical chemistry, which treats the physical laws and energetics governing chemical reactions. Naturally, there is a great deal of overlap between these different areas, and the boundaries are becoming increasingly blurred. After a general course at the collegial level, courses in organic, inorganic, analytical and physical chemistry are offered through the university years. Since chemistry is an experimental science, laboratory classes accompany most undergraduate courses. In addition, courses are offered in polymer, theoretical, green, nano and biological chemistry to upper-year undergraduates.

There are two main programs in the Department of Chemistry, Honours and Major. The Honours program is intended primarily for students wishing to pursue graduate studies in chemistry. While the Major program is somewhat less specialized, it is still recognized as sufficient training for a career in chemistry. It can also lead to graduate studies although an additional qualifying year may be necessary. There are also a number of Faculty programs available. Interested students may inquire about these at the Student Advisory Office, Room 304, Otto Maass Chemistry Building, or see www.mcgill.ca/chemistry/advising.

PRE-PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Students entering from the Freshman program must have included CHEM 120/CHEM 110, BIOL 111 or BIOL 112, MATH 150/ MATH 151 or MATH 140/ MATH 141, PHYS 131/PHYS 142, or their equivalents in their Freshman year. Quebec students must have completed the DEC with appropriate science and mathematics courses.

REQUIRED COURSES IN CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS

The required courses in Chemistry programs consist of 56 credits in chemistry, physics and mathematics, listed below. The courses marked with an asterisk (*) are omitted from the program of students who have successfully completed them at the CEGEP level but the Chemistry courses must be replaced by courses in that discipline if students wish to be eligible for admission to the Ordre des chimistes du Québec. Students from outside Quebec or transfer students should consult the academic adviser.

A computer science course, either COMP 102 or COMP 202, will be required during U1 for students who have no previous introduction to computer programming. Students are required to contact their adviser on this matter. Completion of Mathematics MATH 222 and MATH 315 during U1 is strongly recommended. Physics PHYS 242 should be completed during U2.

Chemistry Majors and Honours Programs
Required Courses
(56 credits)
CHEM 212*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 213
(3)
Introductory Physical Chemistry
CHEM 222*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 2
CHEM 273
(1)
Chemical Kinetics
CHEM 277D1
(1.5)
Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 277D2
(1.5)
Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 281
(3)
Inorganic Chemistry 1
CHEM 302
(3)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 345
(3)
Molecular Properties and Structure 1
CHEM 355
(3)
Molecular Properties and Structure 2
CHEM 363
(2)
Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 365
(2)
Statistical Thermodynamics
CHEM 367
(3)
Instrumental Analysis 1
CHEM 377
(3)
Instrumental Analysis 2
CHEM 381
(3)
Inorganic Chemistry 2
CHEM 392
(3)
Integrated Inorganic/Organic Laboratory
CHEM 393
(2)
Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2
MATH 133*
(3)
Vectors, Matrices and Geometry
MATH 222*
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
PHYS 242
(2)
Electricity and Magnetism
* asterisks denote courses with CEGEP equivalents
HONOURS IN CHEMISTRY
(74 credits)
Required Courses
(56 credits)
56 credits as listed above
Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
6 credits of research*:
CHEM 470
(6)
Research Project
or CHEM 480
(3)
Research Project
and CHEM 490
(3)
Research Project
and 12 credits of additional Chemistry courses:
6 credits of which must be at the 300 level or higher, and
6 credits of which must be at the 400 level or higher
* Students may take up to 12 Research Project credits but only 6 of these may be used to fulfill the program requirement.
Attainment of the Honours degree requires a CGPA of at least 3.00.
HONOURS WITH BIO-ORGANIC OPTION
(78 credits)
Required Courses
(60 credits)
54 credits, all courses specified above for Chemistry Honours, except PHYS 242
plus the following 6 credits:
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
6 credits of research*:
CHEM 470
(6)
Research Project
or CHEM 480
(3)
Research Project
and CHEM 490
(3)
Research Project
6 credits, two of:
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 301
(3)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
CHEM 502
(3)
Advanced Bio-Organic Chemistry
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
MIMM 314
(3)
Immunology
MIMM 323
(3)
Microbial Physiology
PHGY 201
(3)
Human Physiology: Control Systems
PHGY 202
(3)
Human Physiology: Body Functions
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
and 6 credits of additional Chemistry courses at the 400 level or higher.
* Students may take up to 12 Research Project credits but only 6 of these may be used to fulfill the program requirement.
Attainment of the Honours degree requires a CGPA of at least 3.00.
HONOURS IN CHEMISTRY: ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY OPTION
(77 credits)
Required Courses
(62 credits)
56 credits, all courses specified above for Honours Chemistry,
plus the following 6 credits
CHEM 219
(3)
Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
CHEM 307
(3)
Analytical Chemistry of Pollutants
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
6 credits of research*:
CHEM 470
(6)
Research Project
or CHEM 480
(3)
Research Project
and CHEM 490
(3)
Research Project
3 credits, one of:
CHEM 419
(3)
Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere
CHEM 462
(3)
Green Chemistry
CHEM 567
(3)
Chemometrics: Data Analysis
CHEM 575
(3)
Chemical Kinetics
6 credits, two of
ATOC 220
(3)
Introduction to Oceanic Sciences
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 597
(3)
Analytical Spectroscopy
EPSC 542
(3)
Chemical Oceanography
* Students may take up to 12 Research Project credits but only 6 of these may be used to fulfill the program requirement.
Attainment of the Honours degree requires a CGPA of at least 3.00.
HONOURS WITH MATERIALS OPTION
(77 credits)
Required Courses
(62 credits)
56 credits, all courses specified above for Honours Chemistry
plus the following 6 credits:
CHEM 344
(3)
Advanced Materials
CHEM 455
(3)
Introductory Polymer Chemistry
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
6 credits of research*:
CHEM 470
(6)
Research Project
or CHEM 480
(3)
Research Project
and CHEM 490
(3)
Research Project
6 credits, two of:
CHEM 531
(3)
Chemistry of Inorganic Materials
CHEM 534
(3)
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
CHEM 543
(3)
Chemistry of Pulp and Paper
CHEM 571
(3)
Polymer Synthesis
CHEM 585
(3)
Colloid Chemistry
3 credits, one of:
CHEE 481
(3)
Polymer Engineering
MIME 260
(3)
Materials Science and Engineering
MRKT 360
(3)
Marketing of Technology
* Students may take up to 12 Research Project credits but only 6 of these may be used to fulfill the program requirement.
Attainment of the Honours degree requires a CGPA of at least 3.00.

JOINT HONOURS IN PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY, under Physics.

MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY
(62 credits)
Required Courses
(56 credits)
56 credits as listed above
Complementary Courses
(6 credits)
6 credits of additional Chemistry courses at the 300 level or higher.

Attainment of the Major degree requires a CGPA of 2.00.

MAJOR WITH BIO-ORGANIC OPTION
(66 credits)
Required Courses
(63 credits)
54 credits, all courses specified above for the Chemistry Major, except PHYS 242
plus the following 9 credits:
BIOL 200
(3)
Molecular Biology
BIOL 201
(3)
Cell Biology and Metabolism
CHEM 502
(3)
Advanced Bio-Organic Chemistry
Complementary Course
(3 credits)
one of:
BIOL 202
(3)
Basic Genetics
BIOL 301
(3)
Cell and Molecular Laboratory
MIMM 211
(3)
Introductory Microbiology
PHGY 201
(3)
Human Physiology: Control Systems
PHGY 202
(3)
Human Physiology: Body Functions
PHGY 209
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 1
PHGY 210
(3)
Mammalian Physiology 2
Attainment of the Major degree requires a CGPA of 2.00.
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY: ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY OPTION
(65 credits)
Required Courses
(62 credits)
56 credits, all courses specified above for the Chemistry Major,
plus the following 6 credits:
CHEM 219
(3)
Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry
CHEM 307
(3)
Analytical Chemistry of Pollutants
Complementary Course
(3 credits)
one of:
CHEM 419
(3)
Advances in Chemistry of Atmosphere
CHEM 462
(3)
Green Chemistry
CHEM 567
(3)
Chemometrics: Data Analysis
CHEM 575
(3)
Chemical Kinetics
Attainment of the Major degree requires a CGPA of 2.00.
MAJOR WITH MATERIALS OPTION
(65 credits)
Required Courses
(62 credits)
56 credits, all courses specified above for the Chemistry Major,
plus the following 6 credits:
CHEM 344
(3)
Advanced Materials
CHEM 455
(3)
Introductory Polymer Chemistry
Complementary Course

(3 credits)

one of:
CHEM 531
(3)
Chemistry of Inorganic Materials
CHEM 534
(3)
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
CHEM 543
(3)
Chemistry of Pulp and Paper
CHEM 571
(3)
Polymer Synthesis
CHEM 585
(3)
Colloid Chemistry
Attainment of the Major degree requires a CGPA of 2.00.

FACULTY PROGRAMS IN CHEMISTRY

Faculty programs in Chemistry are constructed from the U1 courses and the general courses of U2 and U3 intended for these students. Consult the Department of Chemistry Student Advisory Office for an adviser. A computer science course, either COMP 102 or COMP 202, will be required during U1 for students who have no previous introduction to computer programming.

FACULTY PROGRAM IN CHEMISTRY
(52 credits)
Required Courses
(31 credits)
CHEM 212*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 1
CHEM 222*
(4)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 2
CHEM 277D1
(1.5)
Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 277D2
(1.5)
Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 302
(3)
Introductory Organic Chemistry 3
CHEM 345
(3)
Molecular Properties and Structure 1
CHEM 367
(3)
Instrumental Analysis 1
CHEM 377
(3)
Instrumental Analysis 2
MATH 222*
(3)
Calculus 3
MATH 315
(3)
Ordinary Differential Equations
PHYS 242
(2)
Electricity and Magnetism
* asterisks denote courses with CEGEP equivalents
Complementary Courses
(21 credits)
6 credits, one of the following course sets:
CHEM 204
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 1
and CHEM 214
(3)
Physical Chemistry/Biological Sciences 2
or CHEM 213
(3)
Introductory Physical Chemistry
and CHEM 355
(3)
Molecular Properties and Structure 2
6 credits, two of the following courses:
CHEM 201
(3)
Modern Inorganic Chemistry 1
or CHEM 281
(3)
Inorganic Chemistry 1
CHEM 301
(3)
Modern Inorganic Chemistry 2
or CHEM 381
(3)
Inorganic Chemistry 2
9 credits from:
CHEM 352
(3)
Structural Organic Chemistry
CHEM 355
(3)
Molecular Properties and Structure 2
CHEM 363
(2)
Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 382
(3)
Organic Chemistry: Natural Products